Event Title

Examining the effects of different diets and Salinities on Tigriopus californicus copepods population growth

Presentation Abstract

The coastal oceans are subject to climate impacts leading to sea level rise, increases in the frequency and intensity of storms, and increased precipitation. These events can lead to a rise in the amount of fresh water entering coastal ecosystems from runoff or rainfall, which cause decreases in ocean salinity. Understanding marine food web dynamics requires an understanding of how species interactions will respond to environmental changes of this kind. Sea urchins are key members of nearshore food webs and may help to link food availability between shallow and deep zones along coastal areas. Urchins’ inefficient digestion, means that their feces may possess large amounts of available nutrients, which other organisms can use as a viable food source. I studied population growth of T. californicus copepods in both low salinity and normal seawater environments, and with diets of either fresh Ulva or urchin fecal Ulva. I also examined the caloric content of these different diets. Results show that both diet and salinity significantly affected population growth, low salinity is the better environment, and fresh Ulva is the better diet.

Session Title

Climate Change and Culturally Important Foods, Resources, and Places in the Salish Ecosystem

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Examining the effects of different diets and Salinities on Tigriopus californicus copepods population growth

2016SSEC

The coastal oceans are subject to climate impacts leading to sea level rise, increases in the frequency and intensity of storms, and increased precipitation. These events can lead to a rise in the amount of fresh water entering coastal ecosystems from runoff or rainfall, which cause decreases in ocean salinity. Understanding marine food web dynamics requires an understanding of how species interactions will respond to environmental changes of this kind. Sea urchins are key members of nearshore food webs and may help to link food availability between shallow and deep zones along coastal areas. Urchins’ inefficient digestion, means that their feces may possess large amounts of available nutrients, which other organisms can use as a viable food source. I studied population growth of T. californicus copepods in both low salinity and normal seawater environments, and with diets of either fresh Ulva or urchin fecal Ulva. I also examined the caloric content of these different diets. Results show that both diet and salinity significantly affected population growth, low salinity is the better environment, and fresh Ulva is the better diet.