Presentation Title

Assembling a multi species view of population level differentiation of marine life in the Salish Sea.

Session Title

Changes in Ecosystem Function and Climate Revealed by Long-term Monitoring in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Our goal is to understand the Salish Sea ecosystem more completely by studying the population genetics of multiple species, plants and animals, covering a variety of habitats, trophic, and taxonomic groups. We believe these data will help inform ecosystem based management, e.g., the practical design of a network of marine protected areas or reservoirs (MPA). We present results of a population genetic study of English sole collected within the Salish Sea and from offshore as far north as Haida Gwaii, a study done in cooperation with NOAA Teacher in the Laboratory, Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans (CDFO), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). We also illustrate a sample design and the cooperative nature of this type of work by presenting the status of a new genetic and phenetic study of spot prawn that has been initiated with funds from The Suquamish Tribe and in cooperation with CDFO; WDFW; The Lummi, Muckleshoot, Nisqually, and Swinomish tribes; Vancouver Aquarium; and Mariner High School, Everett, WA. Patterns of population variability demonstrated from work in other research laboratories for Olympia oysters, Pacific herring and hake, and yellow eye rockfish are discussed. The ecosystem is experiencing change, including climate change, ocean acidification, and urban growth, and identifying the geographic nature of population variability for a variety of species will help us establish better tools for monitoring and protecting species, species groups, and habitats. In the process, we will learn what abiotic and biotic factors affect the patterns genetic connectivity for different marine taxonomic groups, and therefore be in a better position to understand, model, and track population responses to environmental change. Collaborative and cooperative work like this highlights the diversity of animal and plant life that is found but rarely recognized in our marine backyards.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

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Assembling a multi species view of population level differentiation of marine life in the Salish Sea.

2016SSEC

Our goal is to understand the Salish Sea ecosystem more completely by studying the population genetics of multiple species, plants and animals, covering a variety of habitats, trophic, and taxonomic groups. We believe these data will help inform ecosystem based management, e.g., the practical design of a network of marine protected areas or reservoirs (MPA). We present results of a population genetic study of English sole collected within the Salish Sea and from offshore as far north as Haida Gwaii, a study done in cooperation with NOAA Teacher in the Laboratory, Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans (CDFO), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). We also illustrate a sample design and the cooperative nature of this type of work by presenting the status of a new genetic and phenetic study of spot prawn that has been initiated with funds from The Suquamish Tribe and in cooperation with CDFO; WDFW; The Lummi, Muckleshoot, Nisqually, and Swinomish tribes; Vancouver Aquarium; and Mariner High School, Everett, WA. Patterns of population variability demonstrated from work in other research laboratories for Olympia oysters, Pacific herring and hake, and yellow eye rockfish are discussed. The ecosystem is experiencing change, including climate change, ocean acidification, and urban growth, and identifying the geographic nature of population variability for a variety of species will help us establish better tools for monitoring and protecting species, species groups, and habitats. In the process, we will learn what abiotic and biotic factors affect the patterns genetic connectivity for different marine taxonomic groups, and therefore be in a better position to understand, model, and track population responses to environmental change. Collaborative and cooperative work like this highlights the diversity of animal and plant life that is found but rarely recognized in our marine backyards.