Event Title

The effect of interannual variation in oxygen concentration and temperature on euphausiid habitat availability in Hood Canal, WA, 2006-2015

Presentation Abstract

Hood Canal has a long history of seasonal hypoxia with fish kills reported more frequently in the recent decades. Because Euphausia pacifica is a dominant euphausiid species in Hood Canal and a key prey for fish, mammals, and seabirds, their responses to hypoxia and environmental changes play a key role in both ecosystem functioning and fisheries. Here, we investigate long-term variability in E. pacifica habitat availability using a combination of field observations and published data. Based on depth-stratified plankton tows at two stations in summer through fall, 2012 & 2013, we observed abundant juvenile and adult euphausiids in low dissolved oxygen waters in Hood Canal, e.g. O2/l, while their larvae showed clear avoidance of 2/l. Integrating field observations with published respiration experiments, we assess the proportion of habitats available for E. pacifica in each life stage under different temperature and oxygen they experienced in the field. Archive real-time vertical profiles of oceanographic data were obtained from the Oceanic Remote Chemical Analyzer (ORCA) buoys at multiple locations in Hood Canal. We compare temporal and spatial differences in the habitat availability during the last decade, including during “The Blob” when suitable habitats were substantially compressed for all life stages. We finally discuss the application of long-term data as a key tool to understand the challenges of future environmental change for euphausiids and, as a consequence, the food webs of temperate coastal ecosystems.

Session Title

Changes in Ecosystem Function and Climate Revealed by Long-term Monitoring in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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The effect of interannual variation in oxygen concentration and temperature on euphausiid habitat availability in Hood Canal, WA, 2006-2015

2016SSEC

Hood Canal has a long history of seasonal hypoxia with fish kills reported more frequently in the recent decades. Because Euphausia pacifica is a dominant euphausiid species in Hood Canal and a key prey for fish, mammals, and seabirds, their responses to hypoxia and environmental changes play a key role in both ecosystem functioning and fisheries. Here, we investigate long-term variability in E. pacifica habitat availability using a combination of field observations and published data. Based on depth-stratified plankton tows at two stations in summer through fall, 2012 & 2013, we observed abundant juvenile and adult euphausiids in low dissolved oxygen waters in Hood Canal, e.g. O2/l, while their larvae showed clear avoidance of 2/l. Integrating field observations with published respiration experiments, we assess the proportion of habitats available for E. pacifica in each life stage under different temperature and oxygen they experienced in the field. Archive real-time vertical profiles of oceanographic data were obtained from the Oceanic Remote Chemical Analyzer (ORCA) buoys at multiple locations in Hood Canal. We compare temporal and spatial differences in the habitat availability during the last decade, including during “The Blob” when suitable habitats were substantially compressed for all life stages. We finally discuss the application of long-term data as a key tool to understand the challenges of future environmental change for euphausiids and, as a consequence, the food webs of temperate coastal ecosystems.