Presentation Title

Developing a high-resolution riverine thermalscape for the Puget Sound Basin

Session Title

Changes in Ecosystem Function and Climate Revealed by Long-term Monitoring in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Climate Change and Ocean Acidification

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Climate change in the Pacific Northwest is predicted to increase air temperature, decrease winter snowpack, and contribute to the melting of alpine glaciers. All of these changes have the potential to decrease summer baseflows while concomitantly increasing stream temperatures in the Puget Sound Basin (PSB). Stream temperature is a dominant environmental driver that affects processes such as primary production, nutrient cycling, and salmonid growth, development, and survival. As such, it is important in the PSB to understand current stream temperature conditions, identify data gaps, and model how temperatures are likely to change in the future. The U.S. Forest Service NorWeST Project created a series of temperature maps for stream networks throughout the Pacific Northwest, including projections under multiple climate change scenarios. However, the in-stream data used to develop these maps were sparse at some locations leading to uncertainty in stream temperature predictions. We will work with federal, state, county, tribal, non-governmental organizations, and academic collaborators to assemble stream temperature data collected in the PSB, focusing on historical data from the last two decades. Stream temperature observations and climatic, vegetation, and geomorphic predictors will be used in a spatial stream network model similar in approach to the NorWeST model to improve the resolution of the PSB riverine thermalscape, which will facilitate improved modeling of the effects of future climate change on stream habitats in the PSB.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Developing a high-resolution riverine thermalscape for the Puget Sound Basin

2016SSEC

Climate change in the Pacific Northwest is predicted to increase air temperature, decrease winter snowpack, and contribute to the melting of alpine glaciers. All of these changes have the potential to decrease summer baseflows while concomitantly increasing stream temperatures in the Puget Sound Basin (PSB). Stream temperature is a dominant environmental driver that affects processes such as primary production, nutrient cycling, and salmonid growth, development, and survival. As such, it is important in the PSB to understand current stream temperature conditions, identify data gaps, and model how temperatures are likely to change in the future. The U.S. Forest Service NorWeST Project created a series of temperature maps for stream networks throughout the Pacific Northwest, including projections under multiple climate change scenarios. However, the in-stream data used to develop these maps were sparse at some locations leading to uncertainty in stream temperature predictions. We will work with federal, state, county, tribal, non-governmental organizations, and academic collaborators to assemble stream temperature data collected in the PSB, focusing on historical data from the last two decades. Stream temperature observations and climatic, vegetation, and geomorphic predictors will be used in a spatial stream network model similar in approach to the NorWeST model to improve the resolution of the PSB riverine thermalscape, which will facilitate improved modeling of the effects of future climate change on stream habitats in the PSB.