Presentation Title

Living Shorelines - a national movement to encourage soft shorelines to address resiliency

Session Title

Upping the Action: Regional Climate Change Abatement

Conference Track

Protection, Remediation and Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

In contrast to other coastal communities in the United States and Canada, Washington State discusses armoring almost exclusively on the impact to habitat and not on its relationship to sea level rise and storm impacts. Guidance and outreach has been developed to promote soft shorelines as an alternative shoreline stabilization method to improve habitat value. In this session you will learn about a national movement to promote the concept of Living Shorelines, or soft shorelines, to create more resilient coastal communities. NOAA defines the concept as “a range of shoreline stabilization techniques along estuarine coasts, bays, sheltered coastlines, and tributaries… Living shorelines maintain continuity of the natural land–water interface and reduce erosion while providing habitat value and enhancing coastal resilience.” This session will examine research that demonstrates benefits of living shorelines to address resiliency. Information will be provided about different aspects of the national conversation about living shorelines including how the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed design guidance called Systems Approach to Geomorphic Engineering (SAGE); discussions by federal agencies to develop streamlined permitting to encourage living shorelines; development of education and outreach materials to promote living shorelines. It will be demonstrated how these efforts tie directly in with Washington State soft shoreline efforts. Examples will be provided about how outreach and education to shoreline homeowners can incorporate these resiliency concepts along with protection of habitat in the Salish Sea.

Comments

Additional information about Living Shorelines and SAGE:

http://www.habitat.noaa.gov/pdf/noaa_guidance_for_considering_the_use_of_living_shorelines_2015.pdf

https://coast.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/_/pdf/living-shoreline-brochure.pdf

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Living Shorelines - a national movement to encourage soft shorelines to address resiliency

2016SSEC

In contrast to other coastal communities in the United States and Canada, Washington State discusses armoring almost exclusively on the impact to habitat and not on its relationship to sea level rise and storm impacts. Guidance and outreach has been developed to promote soft shorelines as an alternative shoreline stabilization method to improve habitat value. In this session you will learn about a national movement to promote the concept of Living Shorelines, or soft shorelines, to create more resilient coastal communities. NOAA defines the concept as “a range of shoreline stabilization techniques along estuarine coasts, bays, sheltered coastlines, and tributaries… Living shorelines maintain continuity of the natural land–water interface and reduce erosion while providing habitat value and enhancing coastal resilience.” This session will examine research that demonstrates benefits of living shorelines to address resiliency. Information will be provided about different aspects of the national conversation about living shorelines including how the US Army Corps of Engineers has developed design guidance called Systems Approach to Geomorphic Engineering (SAGE); discussions by federal agencies to develop streamlined permitting to encourage living shorelines; development of education and outreach materials to promote living shorelines. It will be demonstrated how these efforts tie directly in with Washington State soft shoreline efforts. Examples will be provided about how outreach and education to shoreline homeowners can incorporate these resiliency concepts along with protection of habitat in the Salish Sea.