Presentation Title

Vessel Traffic Safety Analysis and Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment: Columbia River, Puget Sound, and the Washington Coast

Session Title

Fossil Fuel Export Panel

Conference Track

Fate and Effects of Pollutants

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

New energy transfer terminals are proposed along the lower Columbia River, in the Puget Sound region, and on the Washington Coast. This presentation will describe risk assessment projects that the Washington State Department of Ecology is undertaking to assess the impacts of this changing energy picture. In 2015, the Legislature passed ESHB 1449, an act relating to oil transportation. Among other actions, the bill directs Ecology to assess prevention and response measures on the Columbia River and to develop recommendations to improve vessel traffic safety and management. This assessment will: address the possible need for tug escorts for oil tankers and barges; review best achievable protection; address tug capabilities to ensure safe escort; and analyze the amount of oil being transferred onto vessels as a result of rail transport. Ecology is working with the Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Committee and consulting with U.S. Coast Guard, Oregon Board of Maritime Pilots, Lower Columbia River Bar Pilots, Columbia River Pilots, area tribes, public ports in Oregon and Washington, local governments, and other appropriate entities. A draft report will be sent to the legislature by December of 2017. Ecology is also working with the Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee to update the 2010 Puget Sound Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment (VTRA) in order to maintain the accuracy and usefulness of the VTRA model. The update will incorporate vessel traffic data through 2015, and will examine proposed development scenarios and risk mitigation measures. A final report will support stakeholder discussions to determine actionable recommendations to improve vessel traffic safety and reduce oil spill risk potential. Future risk studies, if funded, may examine vessel traffic and oil spill risk in Grays Harbor and consider the impact of oil movement by rail as it relates to emergency response and oil spill risk.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Vessel Traffic Safety Analysis and Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment: Columbia River, Puget Sound, and the Washington Coast

2016SSEC

New energy transfer terminals are proposed along the lower Columbia River, in the Puget Sound region, and on the Washington Coast. This presentation will describe risk assessment projects that the Washington State Department of Ecology is undertaking to assess the impacts of this changing energy picture. In 2015, the Legislature passed ESHB 1449, an act relating to oil transportation. Among other actions, the bill directs Ecology to assess prevention and response measures on the Columbia River and to develop recommendations to improve vessel traffic safety and management. This assessment will: address the possible need for tug escorts for oil tankers and barges; review best achievable protection; address tug capabilities to ensure safe escort; and analyze the amount of oil being transferred onto vessels as a result of rail transport. Ecology is working with the Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Committee and consulting with U.S. Coast Guard, Oregon Board of Maritime Pilots, Lower Columbia River Bar Pilots, Columbia River Pilots, area tribes, public ports in Oregon and Washington, local governments, and other appropriate entities. A draft report will be sent to the legislature by December of 2017. Ecology is also working with the Puget Sound Harbor Safety Committee to update the 2010 Puget Sound Vessel Traffic Risk Assessment (VTRA) in order to maintain the accuracy and usefulness of the VTRA model. The update will incorporate vessel traffic data through 2015, and will examine proposed development scenarios and risk mitigation measures. A final report will support stakeholder discussions to determine actionable recommendations to improve vessel traffic safety and reduce oil spill risk potential. Future risk studies, if funded, may examine vessel traffic and oil spill risk in Grays Harbor and consider the impact of oil movement by rail as it relates to emergency response and oil spill risk.