Event Title

Mitigation of Marine Noise through Strategic Planning, Conservation and Management Support: the effective use of knowledge exchange to aid decision making.

Presentation Abstract

Concerns are being raised over the growing evidence documenting impacts of ship-source marine noise on marine species. Anthropogenic noise can affect marine organisms in a range of ways including ‘masking’ of animals own vocalisations used for communication, navigation, foraging and hazard avoidance which can lead to increased stress, disturbance, deafness and mortalities. Increasingly, calls are being made for noise mitigation strategies and management frameworks to be put in place. One of the proposed possible mechanisms by which to translate this concept of noise management has been through the use of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and Marine Protected Area (MPA) initiatives. However, the importance of MPAs and their effectiveness as a management tool for helping to mitigate underwater noise, in conjunction with their integration within a broader MSP approach, has as yet not been investigated, therefore further exploration and analysis is both pertinent and essential.

This research considers the study areas employed by three previous MEOPAR projects (NEMES, WHaLE and 3MTSim) however for the purposes of spatial analysis work and coordinating outreach activities the focus of this project is on waters within British Columbia, and in particular the Salish Sea. This work also considers how the outputs from these projects together with end-user knowledge can be used to further inform marine management and conservation objectives. Specifically, by addressing the following questions:

1) How can MPAs and networks of MPAs be used to provide marine mammals protection from marine noise and, in particular, what degree of protection could they permit migratory species?

2) How can MSP, with integrated ‘quiet’ MPAs and ‘quiet’ MPA corridors, strategically and effectively manage ship-based noise within a broader socio-economic and environmental context?

What are the most effective means of building awareness, literacy and management support related to ocean noise for planners, regulators, industry and the wider marine community?

Session Title

General Marine Habitat

Conference Track

Habitat

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Mitigation of Marine Noise through Strategic Planning, Conservation and Management Support: the effective use of knowledge exchange to aid decision making.

2016SSEC

Concerns are being raised over the growing evidence documenting impacts of ship-source marine noise on marine species. Anthropogenic noise can affect marine organisms in a range of ways including ‘masking’ of animals own vocalisations used for communication, navigation, foraging and hazard avoidance which can lead to increased stress, disturbance, deafness and mortalities. Increasingly, calls are being made for noise mitigation strategies and management frameworks to be put in place. One of the proposed possible mechanisms by which to translate this concept of noise management has been through the use of Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and Marine Protected Area (MPA) initiatives. However, the importance of MPAs and their effectiveness as a management tool for helping to mitigate underwater noise, in conjunction with their integration within a broader MSP approach, has as yet not been investigated, therefore further exploration and analysis is both pertinent and essential.

This research considers the study areas employed by three previous MEOPAR projects (NEMES, WHaLE and 3MTSim) however for the purposes of spatial analysis work and coordinating outreach activities the focus of this project is on waters within British Columbia, and in particular the Salish Sea. This work also considers how the outputs from these projects together with end-user knowledge can be used to further inform marine management and conservation objectives. Specifically, by addressing the following questions:

1) How can MPAs and networks of MPAs be used to provide marine mammals protection from marine noise and, in particular, what degree of protection could they permit migratory species?

2) How can MSP, with integrated ‘quiet’ MPAs and ‘quiet’ MPA corridors, strategically and effectively manage ship-based noise within a broader socio-economic and environmental context?

What are the most effective means of building awareness, literacy and management support related to ocean noise for planners, regulators, industry and the wider marine community?