Presentation Title

Seasonal use of artificial reefs at Deltaport Terminal by reef fishes

Session Title

Challenges and opportunities related to habitat enhancement, restoration, and ecosystem productivity in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Habitat

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Keywords

Keywords: Reef fish, artificial reef, compensation habitat, Port Metro Vancouver, spawning habitat, Lingcod, Rockfish, Deltaport, fish community

Abstract

Ten artificial marine reefs were constructed off the south side of the Deltaport Terminal, in Delta BC, from 1994 to 2009. Two reefs were constructed in 1994 and 2001 to improve biodiversity and productive capacity in the area; while eight additional reefs were created as habitat compensation for port expansions at Deltaport Terminal from 2007 to 2009. Surveys have been conducted on these reefs and the surrounding area since 2004 to document the establishment of a fish community on the reefs and their use as a spawning habitat for lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus). Most recently, the reefs and surrounding area were surveyed in 2012 and 2013 to inform a future effects assessment for the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project (RBT2), a new three-berth marine terminal in Delta, BC being proposed by Port Metro Vancouver. Surveys included SCUBA, bottom trawl and towed underwater video to document seasonal fish composition, abundance and richness on the reefs and surrounding area; seasonal fish habitat characteristics including key biota; and quantitatively compare the density of major reef fish species between seasons and reefs. Additionally, dive surveys were conducted in 2013 to assess lingcod egg mass productivity indicators. The results of these surveys will be presented and discussed in the context of other reefs in the Strait of Georgia. The RBT2 survey results are part of a body of data related to the artificial reefs that has been gathered since 1992, and provide insight into the importance of long-term monitoring programs for habitat compensation projects.

Comments

Keywords: Reef fish, artificial reef, compensation habitat, Port Metro Vancouver, spawning habitat, Lingcod, Rockfish, Deltaport, fish community

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Seasonal use of artificial reefs at Deltaport Terminal by reef fishes

2016SSEC

Ten artificial marine reefs were constructed off the south side of the Deltaport Terminal, in Delta BC, from 1994 to 2009. Two reefs were constructed in 1994 and 2001 to improve biodiversity and productive capacity in the area; while eight additional reefs were created as habitat compensation for port expansions at Deltaport Terminal from 2007 to 2009. Surveys have been conducted on these reefs and the surrounding area since 2004 to document the establishment of a fish community on the reefs and their use as a spawning habitat for lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus). Most recently, the reefs and surrounding area were surveyed in 2012 and 2013 to inform a future effects assessment for the Roberts Bank Terminal 2 Project (RBT2), a new three-berth marine terminal in Delta, BC being proposed by Port Metro Vancouver. Surveys included SCUBA, bottom trawl and towed underwater video to document seasonal fish composition, abundance and richness on the reefs and surrounding area; seasonal fish habitat characteristics including key biota; and quantitatively compare the density of major reef fish species between seasons and reefs. Additionally, dive surveys were conducted in 2013 to assess lingcod egg mass productivity indicators. The results of these surveys will be presented and discussed in the context of other reefs in the Strait of Georgia. The RBT2 survey results are part of a body of data related to the artificial reefs that has been gathered since 1992, and provide insight into the importance of long-term monitoring programs for habitat compensation projects.