Presentation Title

Eelgrass Restoration in the Squamish Estuary

Session Title

The Role of Eelgrass Ecosystems in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

Habitat

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Edith TobeFollow

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Historically eelgrass (Zostera marina) grew in the Squamish Estuary but with forestry, urban development, industrial incursion and dramatic changes to the shoreline over the past 100 years eelgrass habitat had all but disappeared. In 2005 the Squamish River Watershed Society explored restoring eelgrass beds to key intertidal and subtidal areas within the estuary with great success in several locations. To date the eelgrass has become established and is now providing important habitat for numerous aquatic species as part of the intricate estuary food web.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Eelgrass Restoration in the Squamish Estuary

2016SSEC

Historically eelgrass (Zostera marina) grew in the Squamish Estuary but with forestry, urban development, industrial incursion and dramatic changes to the shoreline over the past 100 years eelgrass habitat had all but disappeared. In 2005 the Squamish River Watershed Society explored restoring eelgrass beds to key intertidal and subtidal areas within the estuary with great success in several locations. To date the eelgrass has become established and is now providing important habitat for numerous aquatic species as part of the intricate estuary food web.