Presentation Title

“Sense of Place:” Human Well-being Considerations for Ecological Restoration in Puget Sound

Session Title

Human Wellbeing Related to the Salish Sea

Conference Track

People

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Sense of place is increasingly recognized as key to human wellbeing in social-ecological systems. Yet there is limited understanding about how to define and evaluate it for restoration. Here, we examine the connections between sense of place and human well-being for Puget Sound restoration in the context of shellfish harvesting and other shoreline activities. Using a mixed-methods approach, including semi-structured interviews and guided workshops with tribal and non-tribal residents, we examined sense of place in two regions of Puget Sound. Empirical results show that people’s meanings of sense of place are multi-dimensional and derived from: 1) activities in the near-shore; 2) the practice of cultural and familial heritage; 3) sensory and emotional experiences; and, 4) the maintenance and thickening of social connections. We also found that three conditions play important roles in enabling and fostering place attachment: access, knowledge, and ecological integrity. Improved understanding of a practice-based sense of place is key to the success of creating and enacting successful, resident-supported restoration activities.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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“Sense of Place:” Human Well-being Considerations for Ecological Restoration in Puget Sound

2016SSEC

Sense of place is increasingly recognized as key to human wellbeing in social-ecological systems. Yet there is limited understanding about how to define and evaluate it for restoration. Here, we examine the connections between sense of place and human well-being for Puget Sound restoration in the context of shellfish harvesting and other shoreline activities. Using a mixed-methods approach, including semi-structured interviews and guided workshops with tribal and non-tribal residents, we examined sense of place in two regions of Puget Sound. Empirical results show that people’s meanings of sense of place are multi-dimensional and derived from: 1) activities in the near-shore; 2) the practice of cultural and familial heritage; 3) sensory and emotional experiences; and, 4) the maintenance and thickening of social connections. We also found that three conditions play important roles in enabling and fostering place attachment: access, knowledge, and ecological integrity. Improved understanding of a practice-based sense of place is key to the success of creating and enacting successful, resident-supported restoration activities.