Presentation Title

A Field Guide to the Social Sciences in Conservation: Key Theories, Models, and Applications

Session Title

Behavior Change and the Salish Sea: Science and Application

Conference Track

People

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Dave Ward, Puget Sound Partnership

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Many people enter conservation careers out of a love for the Salish Sea’s flora and fauna. At some point in every career, however, comes the realization that people are at the center of virtually every issue – either as the cause of a problem or as implementers of solutions. Every sub-strategy within the Puget Sound Action Agenda’s Strategic Initiatives is implemented by people. More than 80 percent of those sub-strategies have a social component. More often than not this means we need somebody else to do something beneficial, stop doing something harmful, take some action that is key to the success of a project, or participate in some process. This can leave conservation professionals with natural science backgrounds in unfamiliar territory. This presentation offers a few key social theories, concepts and applications to help you 1) identify appropriate methods to reach your objectives, 2) identify experts with appropriate skill sets, 3) distinguish between different approaches, and 4) better communicate your intent and objectives to others. Drawn from a number of social and behavioral disciplines - including behavioral economics, social marketing, psychology, anthropology, and sociology - these tools bridge theory, research, and practice to help conservation professionals adopt a more comprehensive portfolio of approaches and see greater success achieving their natural resource objectives.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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A Field Guide to the Social Sciences in Conservation: Key Theories, Models, and Applications

2016SSEC

Many people enter conservation careers out of a love for the Salish Sea’s flora and fauna. At some point in every career, however, comes the realization that people are at the center of virtually every issue – either as the cause of a problem or as implementers of solutions. Every sub-strategy within the Puget Sound Action Agenda’s Strategic Initiatives is implemented by people. More than 80 percent of those sub-strategies have a social component. More often than not this means we need somebody else to do something beneficial, stop doing something harmful, take some action that is key to the success of a project, or participate in some process. This can leave conservation professionals with natural science backgrounds in unfamiliar territory. This presentation offers a few key social theories, concepts and applications to help you 1) identify appropriate methods to reach your objectives, 2) identify experts with appropriate skill sets, 3) distinguish between different approaches, and 4) better communicate your intent and objectives to others. Drawn from a number of social and behavioral disciplines - including behavioral economics, social marketing, psychology, anthropology, and sociology - these tools bridge theory, research, and practice to help conservation professionals adopt a more comprehensive portfolio of approaches and see greater success achieving their natural resource objectives.