Event Title

A social-ecological (SES) conceptual model: applications for salmon recovery in Washington State

Presentation Abstract

Research oriented toward understanding and managing socio-ecological systems (SES) requires collaboration from within and between the biophysical and social sciences. Even as SES approaches have gained ground in the development of ecosystem-based management efforts, the perennial disciplinary and meta-disciplinary differences that have challenged interdisciplinary collaborations remain. For the U.S. West Coast, we discuss how an Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) team, informed by a social science working group, focused on the smaller and larger ecological and social contexts of the California Current in developing a conceptual model to promote interdisciplinary dialogue in support of an SES approach. We wished to move from a conceptualization that portrayed an antagonistic relationship between humans and nature to one that integrated humans and social systems into an SES framework. As such, the SES conceptual model that was ultimately developed offers a range of intellectual and management-oriented opportunities for West Coast marine ecosystem researchers and policy-makers, including for the Puget Sound. In particular, our SES conceptual model presents a new and worthwhile framework for examining the distinctive interrelationships, scale considerations and disconnections involved in Puget Sound-centered salmon recovery for Washington State.

Session Title

Integrating Social Science into Ecosystem-Based Management

Conference Track

People

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

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This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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A social-ecological (SES) conceptual model: applications for salmon recovery in Washington State

2016SSEC

Research oriented toward understanding and managing socio-ecological systems (SES) requires collaboration from within and between the biophysical and social sciences. Even as SES approaches have gained ground in the development of ecosystem-based management efforts, the perennial disciplinary and meta-disciplinary differences that have challenged interdisciplinary collaborations remain. For the U.S. West Coast, we discuss how an Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA) team, informed by a social science working group, focused on the smaller and larger ecological and social contexts of the California Current in developing a conceptual model to promote interdisciplinary dialogue in support of an SES approach. We wished to move from a conceptualization that portrayed an antagonistic relationship between humans and nature to one that integrated humans and social systems into an SES framework. As such, the SES conceptual model that was ultimately developed offers a range of intellectual and management-oriented opportunities for West Coast marine ecosystem researchers and policy-makers, including for the Puget Sound. In particular, our SES conceptual model presents a new and worthwhile framework for examining the distinctive interrelationships, scale considerations and disconnections involved in Puget Sound-centered salmon recovery for Washington State.