Event Title

Advantages and Examples of Collaboration During Environmental Review of Projects in the Salish Sea

Presentation Abstract

The Coast Salish Nation covers over 645,000 acres and is the ancestral territory of British Columbia Coast Salish Nations and Western Washington Tribes. The Nation shares family ties, cultural, political alliances and desire to protect our resources in the endangered eco-region. Since time immemorial, the Coast Salish people have related by languages and bloodlines, have lived in the mountains, shorelines and watersheds of the Salish Sea. We, the indigenous peoples of the Salish Sea, honor and respect our sacred trust to restore, preserve and protect our culture, treaties, aboriginal rights and the land, air and waters of the Salish Sea.

Many projects and activities in the Salish Sea which are subject to environmental review requirements have potentially significant economic and environmental consequences. Complex interests, policies, laws, rights, and mandates are held by multiple parties with a direct substantive stake in these projects and activities. Scientific understanding also plays a key role in these projects and the environmental review process.

Referencing selected examples of projects that have undergone or are undergoing environmental review, we will highlight examples to illustrate how multiple interests – for example, economic diversity and growth, as well as environmental protection – can interact with respect for each others’ mandates as governments, citizens, and first peoples. Through our participation in this session, we hope to contribute to better understanding of each others’ mandates and our collective tools for achieving our respective interests.

Session Title

Cross-Border Exchange: Environmental Review Processes for Projects with Transboundary Impacts

Conference Track

Policy and Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Advantages and Examples of Collaboration During Environmental Review of Projects in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

The Coast Salish Nation covers over 645,000 acres and is the ancestral territory of British Columbia Coast Salish Nations and Western Washington Tribes. The Nation shares family ties, cultural, political alliances and desire to protect our resources in the endangered eco-region. Since time immemorial, the Coast Salish people have related by languages and bloodlines, have lived in the mountains, shorelines and watersheds of the Salish Sea. We, the indigenous peoples of the Salish Sea, honor and respect our sacred trust to restore, preserve and protect our culture, treaties, aboriginal rights and the land, air and waters of the Salish Sea.

Many projects and activities in the Salish Sea which are subject to environmental review requirements have potentially significant economic and environmental consequences. Complex interests, policies, laws, rights, and mandates are held by multiple parties with a direct substantive stake in these projects and activities. Scientific understanding also plays a key role in these projects and the environmental review process.

Referencing selected examples of projects that have undergone or are undergoing environmental review, we will highlight examples to illustrate how multiple interests – for example, economic diversity and growth, as well as environmental protection – can interact with respect for each others’ mandates as governments, citizens, and first peoples. Through our participation in this session, we hope to contribute to better understanding of each others’ mandates and our collective tools for achieving our respective interests.