Presentation Title

The Canadian Federal Environmental Assessment Framework, as illustrated by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the National Energy Board

Session Title

Cross-Border Exchange: Environmental Review Processes for Projects with Transboundary Impacts

Conference Track

Policy and Management

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

In this presentation we provide an overview of the Canadian national environmental assessment regime, with particular emphasis on practical aspects relating to public and Indigenous consultation, and participation. We will also review an illustrative case study where there was transboundary interest, highlighting how the transboundary dialogue and engagement actually played out in a concrete example.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring its federal environmental assessment processes:

  • provide robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments of areas under federal jurisdiction, while also working with provinces and territories to avoid duplication;
  • ensure that decisions are based on science, facts, and evidence, and serve the public’s interest;
  • provide ways for the public to express views and opportunities for experts to meaningfully participate; and
  • require project advocates to choose the best technologies available to reduce environmental impacts.

The purpose of the case study portion of this presentation is to examine a Canadian project to illustrate how the environmental assessment process identified/examined transboundary impacts, how the EA process addressed public concerns related to the cross-border impacts and how these concerns weighed into the outcome of the project’s development. By examining a Canadian example that incorporated and considered transboundary input, we hope to provide greater insight into how transboundary impacts in projects have been analyzed and how the public can engage in the environmental assessment process.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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The Canadian Federal Environmental Assessment Framework, as illustrated by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the National Energy Board

2016SSEC

In this presentation we provide an overview of the Canadian national environmental assessment regime, with particular emphasis on practical aspects relating to public and Indigenous consultation, and participation. We will also review an illustrative case study where there was transboundary interest, highlighting how the transboundary dialogue and engagement actually played out in a concrete example.

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring its federal environmental assessment processes:

  • provide robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments of areas under federal jurisdiction, while also working with provinces and territories to avoid duplication;
  • ensure that decisions are based on science, facts, and evidence, and serve the public’s interest;
  • provide ways for the public to express views and opportunities for experts to meaningfully participate; and
  • require project advocates to choose the best technologies available to reduce environmental impacts.

The purpose of the case study portion of this presentation is to examine a Canadian project to illustrate how the environmental assessment process identified/examined transboundary impacts, how the EA process addressed public concerns related to the cross-border impacts and how these concerns weighed into the outcome of the project’s development. By examining a Canadian example that incorporated and considered transboundary input, we hope to provide greater insight into how transboundary impacts in projects have been analyzed and how the public can engage in the environmental assessment process.