Presentation Title

Central Squamish Estuary Brownfield Restoration

Session Title

Marine Ecosystem Restoration in the Urban Environment

Conference Track

Protection, Remediation, & Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Edith TobeFollow

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The focus of this project was to restore a former log sort located in the Central Squamish Estuary back into functional estuarine habitat through re-grading of the site to create a natural tidally influenced wetland salt marsh. Some of the key objectives of this project included: creation of over 35,000 square metres of new estuarine habitat; planting native riparian vegetation; daylighting channels and removal of redundant culverts; removal of fill and overburden and returning the site to historic grades to allow natural estuarine processes to resume; monitoring the site to gauge the carbon sequestering potential (through identifying soil composition, depth, woody debris, and plant matter); installation of educational interpretive signage; exploring eelgrass restoration in the sub-tidal shorelines; Rivers Day Festival event location; and establishing the site as a “living classroom” for university public school students. The 2015 year included the removal of soil layer and re-grading of the site and the construction of tidal channels. Included in the first year were three volunteer planting days (March 7, 22, and September 27) to establish over 2,000 native riparian plants. As well pre-construction monitoring, including soil sampling, bathymetry, aerial surveys, and site survey were completed as part of a long-term monitoring program. Aside from providing important habitat for salmonids and other fisheries and wildlife resources, the restored brownfield will now be used as an outdoor learning classroom by the local schools, university and college students with highlights of the site’s ecological driven services for students. Surveys of the site were conducted in partnership with Squamish Nation and the Seagrass Conservation Working Group to explore the potential for eelgrass restoration along the sub-tidal shoreline. A test planting for eelgrass will be explored in the coming year.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

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Central Squamish Estuary Brownfield Restoration

2016SSEC

The focus of this project was to restore a former log sort located in the Central Squamish Estuary back into functional estuarine habitat through re-grading of the site to create a natural tidally influenced wetland salt marsh. Some of the key objectives of this project included: creation of over 35,000 square metres of new estuarine habitat; planting native riparian vegetation; daylighting channels and removal of redundant culverts; removal of fill and overburden and returning the site to historic grades to allow natural estuarine processes to resume; monitoring the site to gauge the carbon sequestering potential (through identifying soil composition, depth, woody debris, and plant matter); installation of educational interpretive signage; exploring eelgrass restoration in the sub-tidal shorelines; Rivers Day Festival event location; and establishing the site as a “living classroom” for university public school students. The 2015 year included the removal of soil layer and re-grading of the site and the construction of tidal channels. Included in the first year were three volunteer planting days (March 7, 22, and September 27) to establish over 2,000 native riparian plants. As well pre-construction monitoring, including soil sampling, bathymetry, aerial surveys, and site survey were completed as part of a long-term monitoring program. Aside from providing important habitat for salmonids and other fisheries and wildlife resources, the restored brownfield will now be used as an outdoor learning classroom by the local schools, university and college students with highlights of the site’s ecological driven services for students. Surveys of the site were conducted in partnership with Squamish Nation and the Seagrass Conservation Working Group to explore the potential for eelgrass restoration along the sub-tidal shoreline. A test planting for eelgrass will be explored in the coming year.