Presentation Title

Clean Marine BC: a solution to recreational boater and boating facility impacts on the marine environment

Session Title

General protection, remediation and restoration topics

Conference Track

Protection, Remediation, & Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Michelle Young, Georgia Strait AllianceFollow

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Recreational vessels can have a significant impact on wildlife and the marine environment, through habitat disturbances, negative wildlife interactions, and as a source of pollution; sewage, bilge, and greywater discharges, fuel and hydrocarbons leaks, and toxic paints and maintenance products can all contribute to damaging our shared oceans. Fortunately there are many positive solutions available. This poster presentation will speak to the opportunities in preventing and mitigating multiple sources of pollution and disturbance from recreational boating and marinas in BC through the Clean Marine BC (CMBC) program, with a focus on creative solutions beyond those outlined in the Clean Marine BC Marina Best Practices Handbook and the Guide to Green Boating.

Clean Marine BC is a voluntary eco-rating program that certifies marinas, yacht clubs, harbour authorities, and boatyards for environmental best practices. Green boating education and outreach is a significant component of CMBC. Georgia Strait Alliance (GSA), a solutions-oriented marine conservation organization, runs the program. GSA is a member of the Pacific Oil Spill Prevention and Education Team (POSPET), a trans-boundary initiative spanning the waters from Alaska to California. Our work focuses on the Strait of Georgia region, the portion of the Salish Sea north of the Canada-U.S border.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Clean Marine BC: a solution to recreational boater and boating facility impacts on the marine environment

2016SSEC

Recreational vessels can have a significant impact on wildlife and the marine environment, through habitat disturbances, negative wildlife interactions, and as a source of pollution; sewage, bilge, and greywater discharges, fuel and hydrocarbons leaks, and toxic paints and maintenance products can all contribute to damaging our shared oceans. Fortunately there are many positive solutions available. This poster presentation will speak to the opportunities in preventing and mitigating multiple sources of pollution and disturbance from recreational boating and marinas in BC through the Clean Marine BC (CMBC) program, with a focus on creative solutions beyond those outlined in the Clean Marine BC Marina Best Practices Handbook and the Guide to Green Boating.

Clean Marine BC is a voluntary eco-rating program that certifies marinas, yacht clubs, harbour authorities, and boatyards for environmental best practices. Green boating education and outreach is a significant component of CMBC. Georgia Strait Alliance (GSA), a solutions-oriented marine conservation organization, runs the program. GSA is a member of the Pacific Oil Spill Prevention and Education Team (POSPET), a trans-boundary initiative spanning the waters from Alaska to California. Our work focuses on the Strait of Georgia region, the portion of the Salish Sea north of the Canada-U.S border.