Presentation Title

Effectiveness of Low Impact Development Design in Poorly Draining Soils in BC’s Lower Mainland

Session Title

Utilizing Green Infrastructure to improve Water Quality and Environmental Outcomes in the Urban Realm

Conference Track

Protection, Remediation and Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Kerr Wood Leidal (KWL) has designed, constructed and monitored low impact development (LID) designs across the lower mainland of British Columbia. This presentation focuses on the findings of monitoring programs at three new construction residential sites: Silver Ridge Development in Maple Ridge, East Clayton Development in Surrey, and Routley Neighbourhood in Langley. Conclusion will be drawn on effectiveness of LIDs in till and clay soils, their ability to meet stormwater targets in the lower mainland, and their performance over time.

The Silver Ridge residential development in Maple Ridge consists of roadside bio-retention rain gardens and disconnected roof leaders to absorbent amended soil layer and infiltration rock pits. Continuous flow, rainfall, groundwater levels, and runoff water temperature data were collected for three years following the development of the site to evaluate the performance of the LIDs with a particular focus on volume reduction. Recently, eight years after installation of the LIDs, water quality data was collected to evaluate the effectiveness of these mature bio-retention facilities at treating typical pollutants in urban stormwater runoff. At East Clayton residential development in Surrey, KWL monitored flow and groundwater levels for three years. For this neighbourhood, the effectiveness of disconnected roof leaders and infiltration trenches in clay soils is evaluated. Lastly, KWL monitored flows in the Routley Neighbourhood in Langley for eight years. The data is used to compare the flow response between an area that has implemented LIDs (disconnected roof leaders, on-lot infiltration galleries, greenway swales, and base flow diversions) and an area with traditional stormwater conveyance systems.

The operation of the monitored LIDs is compared with stormwater criteria outlined in Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Urban Stormwater Guidelines for the Protection of Fish and Fish Habitat. Conclusions are reached on performance of LIDs in poorly-draining soils both in saturated and unsaturated soil conditions.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Effectiveness of Low Impact Development Design in Poorly Draining Soils in BC’s Lower Mainland

2016SSEC

Kerr Wood Leidal (KWL) has designed, constructed and monitored low impact development (LID) designs across the lower mainland of British Columbia. This presentation focuses on the findings of monitoring programs at three new construction residential sites: Silver Ridge Development in Maple Ridge, East Clayton Development in Surrey, and Routley Neighbourhood in Langley. Conclusion will be drawn on effectiveness of LIDs in till and clay soils, their ability to meet stormwater targets in the lower mainland, and their performance over time.

The Silver Ridge residential development in Maple Ridge consists of roadside bio-retention rain gardens and disconnected roof leaders to absorbent amended soil layer and infiltration rock pits. Continuous flow, rainfall, groundwater levels, and runoff water temperature data were collected for three years following the development of the site to evaluate the performance of the LIDs with a particular focus on volume reduction. Recently, eight years after installation of the LIDs, water quality data was collected to evaluate the effectiveness of these mature bio-retention facilities at treating typical pollutants in urban stormwater runoff. At East Clayton residential development in Surrey, KWL monitored flow and groundwater levels for three years. For this neighbourhood, the effectiveness of disconnected roof leaders and infiltration trenches in clay soils is evaluated. Lastly, KWL monitored flows in the Routley Neighbourhood in Langley for eight years. The data is used to compare the flow response between an area that has implemented LIDs (disconnected roof leaders, on-lot infiltration galleries, greenway swales, and base flow diversions) and an area with traditional stormwater conveyance systems.

The operation of the monitored LIDs is compared with stormwater criteria outlined in Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Urban Stormwater Guidelines for the Protection of Fish and Fish Habitat. Conclusions are reached on performance of LIDs in poorly-draining soils both in saturated and unsaturated soil conditions.