Event Title

Establishing Long-term Stewardship at Habitat Restoration Sites in a Multi-Partner Environment

Presentation Abstract

Providing adequate funding and capacity to address the long-term stewardship needs of restoration projects begs the question of how the stewardship function is organized among all the entities involved in a restoration project. Restoration partners can and often do include a wide variety of organizations including agencies, tribes, businesses and non-profit organizations. The first step is to develop and confirm shared goals among the partners for what ecological services the restored habitat is expected to perform and for what duration. Partners then need to designate roles and responsibilities, and if appropriate seek the support of additional organizations with expertise or abilities in such areas as site maintenance, volunteer management, contingency planning and long-term financial investment of a stewardship fund. Although costs are easiest to estimate after all these elements are in place and the habitat project is built, the most ideal scenario is to have acquired the necessary funds for long-term stewardship in advance of project construction, so a portion of this presentation is devoted to ways of estimating costs pro forma.

Session Title

Marine Ecosystem Restoration in the Urban Environment

Conference Track

Protection, Remediation, and Restoration

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Establishing Long-term Stewardship at Habitat Restoration Sites in a Multi-Partner Environment

2016SSEC

Providing adequate funding and capacity to address the long-term stewardship needs of restoration projects begs the question of how the stewardship function is organized among all the entities involved in a restoration project. Restoration partners can and often do include a wide variety of organizations including agencies, tribes, businesses and non-profit organizations. The first step is to develop and confirm shared goals among the partners for what ecological services the restored habitat is expected to perform and for what duration. Partners then need to designate roles and responsibilities, and if appropriate seek the support of additional organizations with expertise or abilities in such areas as site maintenance, volunteer management, contingency planning and long-term financial investment of a stewardship fund. Although costs are easiest to estimate after all these elements are in place and the habitat project is built, the most ideal scenario is to have acquired the necessary funds for long-term stewardship in advance of project construction, so a portion of this presentation is devoted to ways of estimating costs pro forma.