Presentation Title

Social Impact Investing for Ecological Conservation

Session Title

Social and Policy Interconnections

Conference Track

Salish Sea Snapshots

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type of Presentation

Snapshot

Abstract

Social Impact Investing—as a range of strategies to fund organizations, programs and projects with both economic and social returns—has been looked to as a major new tool for advancing important social causes. Financial institutions face increasing demand for socially responsible investment opportunities, and yet in the environment sector such investments have generally been limited to green infrastructure and energy efficiency. Businesses have begun to understand the necessity to embed ecological considerations into their supply chains, going beyond corporate social responsibility and integrating this thinking to ensure the long term viability of their organization. Among conservationists there is a range of comfort levels with respect to engaging with the private sector, but investors in this realm represent a substantial and growing demand (to the tune of billions per annum).

Such novel funding models can yield both ecological and economic gains, as demonstrated by some conservation organizations via new multi-institutional partnerships (including governments at municipal, regional, and national levels). This talk explores the opportunities and impediments for social impact investing, with particular attention to the Salish Sea, including funding models for proposed new MPAs in the region. We conclude that there is potential for innovation and new types of collaboration to connect resource use, protection, and resilience in an effort to meet national and regional conservation goals.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

Text

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Social Impact Investing for Ecological Conservation

2016SSEC

Social Impact Investing—as a range of strategies to fund organizations, programs and projects with both economic and social returns—has been looked to as a major new tool for advancing important social causes. Financial institutions face increasing demand for socially responsible investment opportunities, and yet in the environment sector such investments have generally been limited to green infrastructure and energy efficiency. Businesses have begun to understand the necessity to embed ecological considerations into their supply chains, going beyond corporate social responsibility and integrating this thinking to ensure the long term viability of their organization. Among conservationists there is a range of comfort levels with respect to engaging with the private sector, but investors in this realm represent a substantial and growing demand (to the tune of billions per annum).

Such novel funding models can yield both ecological and economic gains, as demonstrated by some conservation organizations via new multi-institutional partnerships (including governments at municipal, regional, and national levels). This talk explores the opportunities and impediments for social impact investing, with particular attention to the Salish Sea, including funding models for proposed new MPAs in the region. We conclude that there is potential for innovation and new types of collaboration to connect resource use, protection, and resilience in an effort to meet national and regional conservation goals.