Event Title

Connecting traditional ecological knowledge and natural science: A partnership between state and tribal department of natural resources

Presentation Abstract

Since “time immemorial”, Samish People have been stewards of the places they live. Traditional Lifeways require close observation of the natural world to know when to schedule important events. Times to harvest, times to preserve and times to rest are all shared by the environment. The Samish Indian Nation continues to care about our natural environment holistically and is concerned by changes in climate, ocean acidification, and loss of habitat that birds, animals, fish and humans depend on. Samish traditional knowledge is carried in song, stories and practice that deepen understanding of connection and human relationship with our natural surroundings. The Samish Indian Nation’s Department of Natural Resources is working to integrate this knowledge into current restoration and preservation projects that we are involved in. This poster presentation will include examples of how we are doing this, using our partnership involvement in the Cypress Island estuarine and salt marsh restoration project as an example. Working with State, Federal and local agencies to identify, preserve, protect and enhance all natural resources within Samish historical and cultural territory is important to the Samish Community, continuing a long tradition of natural resource stewardship.

Session Title

General shoreline topics

Conference Track

Shorelines

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Comments

Identifying, preserving, protecting and enhancing all natural resources within Samish historical and cultural territory is important to the Samish Community, continuing a long tradition of natural resource stewardship. This presentation will include examples of how we are doing this, using the Cypress Island estuarine and salt marsh restoration project as an example.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Connecting traditional ecological knowledge and natural science: A partnership between state and tribal department of natural resources

Since “time immemorial”, Samish People have been stewards of the places they live. Traditional Lifeways require close observation of the natural world to know when to schedule important events. Times to harvest, times to preserve and times to rest are all shared by the environment. The Samish Indian Nation continues to care about our natural environment holistically and is concerned by changes in climate, ocean acidification, and loss of habitat that birds, animals, fish and humans depend on. Samish traditional knowledge is carried in song, stories and practice that deepen understanding of connection and human relationship with our natural surroundings. The Samish Indian Nation’s Department of Natural Resources is working to integrate this knowledge into current restoration and preservation projects that we are involved in. This poster presentation will include examples of how we are doing this, using our partnership involvement in the Cypress Island estuarine and salt marsh restoration project as an example. Working with State, Federal and local agencies to identify, preserve, protect and enhance all natural resources within Samish historical and cultural territory is important to the Samish Community, continuing a long tradition of natural resource stewardship.