Presentation Title

Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections

Session Title

General species and food webs

Conference Track

Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Lovel PrattFollow

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

In September 2015, FRIENDS of the San Juans released the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections featuring 18 new or expanded proposed or recently completed projects, which cumulatively would add an additional 5,300 annual vessel transits to and from ports in British Columbia and Washington State. If all the new and expanding terminal and refinery projects in the Salish Sea are permitted and developed, including projects that became operational in 2014, there would be a 43 percent increase in large, commercial marine vessel traffic.

FRIENDS of the San Juans researched and created the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections flyer given the lack of current consolidated vessel traffic projections for British Columbia and Washington State.

The Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections only includes transits for ocean-going vessels. No local barge traffic, anchoring, cueing, and/or bunkering (ship fueling) transits are included. No bunkering related vessel transits for proposed projects in Grays Harbor and/or the Columbia River are included. This version of the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections pre-dates the December 2015 lifting of the ban on exporting US crude oil. No vessel traffic related to any projected US crude oil exports are included.

Web addresses for all source documents and details on the assumptions used to estimate vessel transits are located at http://www.sanjuans.org/safeshipping/documents/Salish_Sea_Vessel_Traffic_Projections_Sept_2015_SOURCE_INFO_final.pdf

Comments

Web addresses for all source documents and details on the assumptions used to estimate vessel transits are located at http://www.sanjuans.org/safeshipping/documents/Salish_Sea_Vessel_Traffic_Projections_Sept_2015_SOURCE_INFO_final.pdf

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

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Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections

2016SSEC

In September 2015, FRIENDS of the San Juans released the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections featuring 18 new or expanded proposed or recently completed projects, which cumulatively would add an additional 5,300 annual vessel transits to and from ports in British Columbia and Washington State. If all the new and expanding terminal and refinery projects in the Salish Sea are permitted and developed, including projects that became operational in 2014, there would be a 43 percent increase in large, commercial marine vessel traffic.

FRIENDS of the San Juans researched and created the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections flyer given the lack of current consolidated vessel traffic projections for British Columbia and Washington State.

The Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections only includes transits for ocean-going vessels. No local barge traffic, anchoring, cueing, and/or bunkering (ship fueling) transits are included. No bunkering related vessel transits for proposed projects in Grays Harbor and/or the Columbia River are included. This version of the Salish Sea Vessel Traffic Projections pre-dates the December 2015 lifting of the ban on exporting US crude oil. No vessel traffic related to any projected US crude oil exports are included.

Web addresses for all source documents and details on the assumptions used to estimate vessel transits are located at http://www.sanjuans.org/safeshipping/documents/Salish_Sea_Vessel_Traffic_Projections_Sept_2015_SOURCE_INFO_final.pdf