Presentation Title

Possible fish sounds recorded in the Salish Sea

Session Title

General species and food webs

Conference Track

Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Presenter/Author Information

Xavier Mouy, JASCO Applied SciencesFollow

Type of Presentation

Oral

Abstract

Several species of fish around the world have been reported to be soniferous. The types of sounds fish produce vary among species and regions but consist typically of low frequency (< 1kHz) pulses and amplitude modulated grunts or croaks. The characterization, identification, and purpose of fish sounds is still largely unknown. Among the ~400 known marine fish species frequenting the waters of British Columbia, only 22 have been reported to be soniferous (Wall et al., 2014). Many more species are suspected to produce sound, but have not been reported yet.

In 2014, two bottom mounted passive acoustic recorders were deployed to characterize the underwater soundscape in the Salish Sea. One was deployed off Hornby Island and was recording continuously at 48 kHz from June to September. The other recorder, located at the mouth of the Fraser Delta, was part of the VENUS cabled observatory and was recording continuously at 64 kHz from March to December. In both of these deployments, many low frequency sounds with acoustic properties similar to the fish sounds reported in various regions of the world were recorded. In order to investigate the provenance of these sounds, a detector based on image processing and machine learning techniques was developed to find these sounds automatically in recordings and allowed to describe their temporal occurrence at both locations. A clustering analysis was also performed to identify the different sound types detected. A comparison of the sound types between the two monitoring locations will be presented. This presentation will discuss what further steps are required to confirm that these sounds are indeed from fish and to link the different sound types identified to specific species.

Rights

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Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Type

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Possible fish sounds recorded in the Salish Sea

2016SSEC

Several species of fish around the world have been reported to be soniferous. The types of sounds fish produce vary among species and regions but consist typically of low frequency (< 1kHz) pulses and amplitude modulated grunts or croaks. The characterization, identification, and purpose of fish sounds is still largely unknown. Among the ~400 known marine fish species frequenting the waters of British Columbia, only 22 have been reported to be soniferous (Wall et al., 2014). Many more species are suspected to produce sound, but have not been reported yet.

In 2014, two bottom mounted passive acoustic recorders were deployed to characterize the underwater soundscape in the Salish Sea. One was deployed off Hornby Island and was recording continuously at 48 kHz from June to September. The other recorder, located at the mouth of the Fraser Delta, was part of the VENUS cabled observatory and was recording continuously at 64 kHz from March to December. In both of these deployments, many low frequency sounds with acoustic properties similar to the fish sounds reported in various regions of the world were recorded. In order to investigate the provenance of these sounds, a detector based on image processing and machine learning techniques was developed to find these sounds automatically in recordings and allowed to describe their temporal occurrence at both locations. A clustering analysis was also performed to identify the different sound types detected. A comparison of the sound types between the two monitoring locations will be presented. This presentation will discuss what further steps are required to confirm that these sounds are indeed from fish and to link the different sound types identified to specific species.