Event Title

Broad based genomic screening for microbes in Salish Sea juvenile Chinook salmon

Presentation Abstract

Juvenile Chinook salmon entering the Salish Sea demonstrate high inter-annual variation in marine survival. Variation in productivity in the early marine environment is hypothesized to be key for survival, with biological stressors such as pathogens potentially acting as secondary factors affecting mortality. Applying genomic technologies, the Molecular Genetics Lab (DFO) has developed a novel high throughput monitoring platform to assess the prevalence and abundance of 45 known or suspected microbes associated with diseases in salmon in British Columbia or worldwide. These include both freshwater and marine origin viruses, bacteria, protozoa, myxozoans, microsporidia and flukes. Here we present a preliminary survey of the stock specific, seasonal prevalence and loads of microbes for juvenile Chinook salmon in the first year at sea originating from Salish sea stocks. Between 2008-2012, fish (n=1870) were sampled in freshwater from hatcheries, in the Salish Sea and along northward migration pathways up to Northern British Columbian coastal waters. Individual genetic stock identification (DFO) was applied so that genomic assessments could track the status of microbes in individual stocks over time and space. At least one microbe of interest was detected in over 90% of juvenile Chinook salmon sampled. While both individual stocks and microbes displayed variant patterns, there was a general trend of increased prevalence, load and microbe abundance as seasons progressed. This survey will form the basis for a larger scope analysis (sample years 2007-2015 on stocks of interest and concern) integrating Chinook salmon origin and life-history as well as spatial and temporal sources of variation in microbe patterns and ultimately relating the presence of microbes to survival trends for Salish Sea stocks.

Session Title

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project- Novel Approaches, Project Status and Key Findings

Conference Track

Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (2016 : Vancouver, B.C.)

Document Type

Event

Location

2016SSEC

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

Text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Broad based genomic screening for microbes in Salish Sea juvenile Chinook salmon

2016SSEC

Juvenile Chinook salmon entering the Salish Sea demonstrate high inter-annual variation in marine survival. Variation in productivity in the early marine environment is hypothesized to be key for survival, with biological stressors such as pathogens potentially acting as secondary factors affecting mortality. Applying genomic technologies, the Molecular Genetics Lab (DFO) has developed a novel high throughput monitoring platform to assess the prevalence and abundance of 45 known or suspected microbes associated with diseases in salmon in British Columbia or worldwide. These include both freshwater and marine origin viruses, bacteria, protozoa, myxozoans, microsporidia and flukes. Here we present a preliminary survey of the stock specific, seasonal prevalence and loads of microbes for juvenile Chinook salmon in the first year at sea originating from Salish sea stocks. Between 2008-2012, fish (n=1870) were sampled in freshwater from hatcheries, in the Salish Sea and along northward migration pathways up to Northern British Columbian coastal waters. Individual genetic stock identification (DFO) was applied so that genomic assessments could track the status of microbes in individual stocks over time and space. At least one microbe of interest was detected in over 90% of juvenile Chinook salmon sampled. While both individual stocks and microbes displayed variant patterns, there was a general trend of increased prevalence, load and microbe abundance as seasons progressed. This survey will form the basis for a larger scope analysis (sample years 2007-2015 on stocks of interest and concern) integrating Chinook salmon origin and life-history as well as spatial and temporal sources of variation in microbe patterns and ultimately relating the presence of microbes to survival trends for Salish Sea stocks.