Presentation Abstract

Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) includes an evolving set of technologies to mitigate the physical and chemical habitat degradation that results from urban runoff entering aquatic ecosystems. Bioretention is a common GSI approach, used, for example in rain gardens, to infiltrate stormwater runoff into soils prior to or instead of discharging into a water body. Initial research has shown that bioretention is biologically effective for preventing most toxicity from urban runoff exposure, but initial trials used fresh bioretention soil media (BSM) with less than 5 repeated treatments. Does bioretention continue to be biologically effective at preventing toxicity over more treatment events? In two concurrent years, coho embryos were fertilized and reared in heath stacks with flow-through well water until hatch. Episodically through development, embryos were exposed to one of several recirculating treatments for 24-48 h; well water, highway runoff, or highway runoff filtered through bioretention. Each filtration event used the same BSM for a total of 25 events across two years of study. Morphometric and molecular measurements of sublethal toxicity were assessed weekly during the final 7 weeks of each year of the study and survival was assessed by the end of each study. Chemical and biological effectiveness of bioretention filtration will be discussed in the context of this study.

Session Title

The Performance of Low Impact Development Applied Across Land Use Scales Using Flow Control, Water Quality and Biological Metrics

Keywords

Green stormwater infrastructue, GSI, Coho embryos

Conference Track

SSE12: Land-Use, Growth, and Development

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE12-241

Start Date

4-4-2018 4:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 4:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 4:30 PM Apr 4th, 4:45 PM

The chemical and biological effectiveness of bioretention for preventing sublethal and lethal toxicity in coho embryos exposed episodically to urban stormwater runoff during development

Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) includes an evolving set of technologies to mitigate the physical and chemical habitat degradation that results from urban runoff entering aquatic ecosystems. Bioretention is a common GSI approach, used, for example in rain gardens, to infiltrate stormwater runoff into soils prior to or instead of discharging into a water body. Initial research has shown that bioretention is biologically effective for preventing most toxicity from urban runoff exposure, but initial trials used fresh bioretention soil media (BSM) with less than 5 repeated treatments. Does bioretention continue to be biologically effective at preventing toxicity over more treatment events? In two concurrent years, coho embryos were fertilized and reared in heath stacks with flow-through well water until hatch. Episodically through development, embryos were exposed to one of several recirculating treatments for 24-48 h; well water, highway runoff, or highway runoff filtered through bioretention. Each filtration event used the same BSM for a total of 25 events across two years of study. Morphometric and molecular measurements of sublethal toxicity were assessed weekly during the final 7 weeks of each year of the study and survival was assessed by the end of each study. Chemical and biological effectiveness of bioretention filtration will be discussed in the context of this study.