Presentation Abstract

The New Brighton Park Shoreline Habitat Restoration Project is situated within New Brighton Park along the south side of Burrard Inlet, west of the Second Narrows Bridge in Vancouver, B.C. The project was undertaken through a partnership with the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, along with Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. The project was part of the port authority’s Habitat Enhancement Program, which focuses on creating, restoring and enhancing fish and wildlife habitat. The project presented a significant opportunity to restore coastal wetland habitat on the south shore of Burrard Inlet. The creation of a tidal wetland at New Brighton Park provides critical habitat for juvenile salmon that migrate along the Burrard Inlet shoreline as they head out to sea. This wetland also provides resting and feeding habitat for local shorebirds. The site was selected based on its potential to benefit a broad range of fish and wildlife species and increase the overall ecological function. Work at the site included excavation and creation of an intertidal wetland, fill placement in riparian areas, slope protection at the two inlets, installation of park features, and installation of fencing to protect the sensitive wetland. Project construction was completed in summer 2017 and included an extensive planting program of approximately 25,000 salt marsh plugs, 200 native trees and 4,000 coastal shrubs. Hydraulically connecting the new wetland to Burrard inlet was significant, as it was the first time since the mid-1960’s that this area has been opened back up (restored) to tidal influence. M&N will discuss the specific design aspects that were implemented across the site through a review if site photographs from before, during and post-construction.

Session Title

Habitat Restoration

Keywords

Habitat, Restoration, Shoreline, New Brighton

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-136

Start Date

5-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 10:15 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 10:00 AM Apr 5th, 10:15 AM

New Brighton shoreline habitat restoration project

The New Brighton Park Shoreline Habitat Restoration Project is situated within New Brighton Park along the south side of Burrard Inlet, west of the Second Narrows Bridge in Vancouver, B.C. The project was undertaken through a partnership with the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority and the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, along with Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. The project was part of the port authority’s Habitat Enhancement Program, which focuses on creating, restoring and enhancing fish and wildlife habitat. The project presented a significant opportunity to restore coastal wetland habitat on the south shore of Burrard Inlet. The creation of a tidal wetland at New Brighton Park provides critical habitat for juvenile salmon that migrate along the Burrard Inlet shoreline as they head out to sea. This wetland also provides resting and feeding habitat for local shorebirds. The site was selected based on its potential to benefit a broad range of fish and wildlife species and increase the overall ecological function. Work at the site included excavation and creation of an intertidal wetland, fill placement in riparian areas, slope protection at the two inlets, installation of park features, and installation of fencing to protect the sensitive wetland. Project construction was completed in summer 2017 and included an extensive planting program of approximately 25,000 salt marsh plugs, 200 native trees and 4,000 coastal shrubs. Hydraulically connecting the new wetland to Burrard inlet was significant, as it was the first time since the mid-1960’s that this area has been opened back up (restored) to tidal influence. M&N will discuss the specific design aspects that were implemented across the site through a review if site photographs from before, during and post-construction.