Presentation Abstract

*** This abstract is for a "Snapshot" (5-min) presentation. *** Many Washington State culverts are currently inadequate for fish passage. Apart from a few special cases, the standard for sizing culverts in Washington State is based on a simple linear function of bankfull width (BFW). This reflects a geomorphic approach to culvert design that can be applied across a large range of situations (Barnard et al. 2013, 2015). Future changes in BFW have previously been estimated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) (Wilhere et al. 2016), by estimating the percent change in BFW derived from projected changes in runoff. This percent change can then be applied to direct observations of channel geometry. The main purpose of this talk is to present a novel new prototype for sizing culverts to account for the effects of climate change. The tool allows a user to enter some basic details about a culvert, choose a proposed design width, and evaluate the likelihood that it will fail to provide fish passage over a particular design lifetime. Likelihoods are estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, resulting in a probability distribution of future bankfull width. These probabilities will be used to assess the likelihood of culvert failure for different choices about how to size it. Since probabilities cannot be assigned to greenhouse gas scenarios, separate probabilities will be assessed for each greenhouse gas scenario, and likelihood estimates are produced for a given design lifetime. The talk will also include results from a recent evaluation of the climate and streamflow data used as the basis of the WDFW report. The work was funded by the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (SITC) via the Skagit Climate Science Consortium (SC2).

Session Title

Snapshot Presentations

Keywords

Climate, Adaptation, Culverts

Conference Track

SSE17: Snapshots

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE17-302

Start Date

5-4-2018 10:20 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 10:25 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 10:20 AM Apr 5th, 10:25 AM

Climate robust culvert design: probabilistic estimates of fish passage impediments

*** This abstract is for a "Snapshot" (5-min) presentation. *** Many Washington State culverts are currently inadequate for fish passage. Apart from a few special cases, the standard for sizing culverts in Washington State is based on a simple linear function of bankfull width (BFW). This reflects a geomorphic approach to culvert design that can be applied across a large range of situations (Barnard et al. 2013, 2015). Future changes in BFW have previously been estimated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) (Wilhere et al. 2016), by estimating the percent change in BFW derived from projected changes in runoff. This percent change can then be applied to direct observations of channel geometry. The main purpose of this talk is to present a novel new prototype for sizing culverts to account for the effects of climate change. The tool allows a user to enter some basic details about a culvert, choose a proposed design width, and evaluate the likelihood that it will fail to provide fish passage over a particular design lifetime. Likelihoods are estimated using a Monte Carlo approach, resulting in a probability distribution of future bankfull width. These probabilities will be used to assess the likelihood of culvert failure for different choices about how to size it. Since probabilities cannot be assigned to greenhouse gas scenarios, separate probabilities will be assessed for each greenhouse gas scenario, and likelihood estimates are produced for a given design lifetime. The talk will also include results from a recent evaluation of the climate and streamflow data used as the basis of the WDFW report. The work was funded by the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community (SITC) via the Skagit Climate Science Consortium (SC2).