Presentation Abstract

The productivity of many Chinook stocks within the Salish Sea has declined dramatically since the 1990s while reductions in marine survival are evident. Researching the mechanisms which control early marine survival of this species has proven to be challenging despite significant efforts. Juveniles occupy a broad range of habitats in their first summer at sea and become increasingly difficulty to study over time. A novel approach using PIT tags to study the survival of juveniles captured throughout their first year of life has shed light on previously unanswered questions. Returning adults were scanned for tags in the river to estimate survival from each stage as well as to identify survivors within each tag group. Although tag returns are expected to continue through 2020 preliminary results are able to partition early mortality in a way not previously possible.

Session Title

The Salish Sea Marine Survival Project: Juvenile Salmonid Growth and Survival

Keywords

Chinook survival, Cowichan River chinook

Conference Track

SSE11: Species and Food Webs

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE11-496

Start Date

5-4-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 11:00 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 10:45 AM Apr 5th, 11:00 AM

Survival of juvenile Cowichan River chinook throughout their first year of life: a summary of PIT tag returns through fall 2017

The productivity of many Chinook stocks within the Salish Sea has declined dramatically since the 1990s while reductions in marine survival are evident. Researching the mechanisms which control early marine survival of this species has proven to be challenging despite significant efforts. Juveniles occupy a broad range of habitats in their first summer at sea and become increasingly difficulty to study over time. A novel approach using PIT tags to study the survival of juveniles captured throughout their first year of life has shed light on previously unanswered questions. Returning adults were scanned for tags in the river to estimate survival from each stage as well as to identify survivors within each tag group. Although tag returns are expected to continue through 2020 preliminary results are able to partition early mortality in a way not previously possible.