Presentation Abstract

Marinas have been shown to contribute elevated levels of metals to marine waters, copper (Cu) in particular. The Cu comes primarily from antifouling paints which are designed to discourage biofouling (barnacles, mussels, and other organisms) of boat hulls. In 2011 the Washington State Legislature passed SSB5436 to phase out Cu in marine antifouling paints. This legislation states that new recreational vessels with Cu-containing bottom paint may not be sold in the state after January 1, 2018. This study provides baseline data for Cu in five marinas of different configuration and size within Puget Sound and assesses potential impacts to marine biota. Four sampling events were conducted between September 2016 and June 2017. Sample media included: water (dissolved and total fractions of metals), sediments (suspended and bottom), and biota (transplanted mussels and biofilms). We found strong evidence, across sample media that Cu accumulate inside marinas to higher levels than outside marinas, regardless of marina configuration. Marinas that are more enclosed, where water is slower to flush in and out, accumulated higher levels of Cu than more open marinas. However, concentrations of Cu were rarely high enough to be above the state water quality criterion for acute impacts to aquatic life. Sediment Cu was also not above the state criteria for the protection of benthic invertebrates. This study provides an adequate baseline dataset to measure progress as a result of recent legislation towards the reduction of Cu to Puget Sound from marinas.

Session Title

Snapshot Presentations

Keywords

Marinas, Copper, Anti-fouling paint

Conference Track

SSE17: Snapshots

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE17-268

Start Date

5-4-2018 10:55 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 11:00 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 10:55 AM Apr 5th, 11:00 AM

Copper accumulation from antifouling paints in five marinas on Puget Sound

Marinas have been shown to contribute elevated levels of metals to marine waters, copper (Cu) in particular. The Cu comes primarily from antifouling paints which are designed to discourage biofouling (barnacles, mussels, and other organisms) of boat hulls. In 2011 the Washington State Legislature passed SSB5436 to phase out Cu in marine antifouling paints. This legislation states that new recreational vessels with Cu-containing bottom paint may not be sold in the state after January 1, 2018. This study provides baseline data for Cu in five marinas of different configuration and size within Puget Sound and assesses potential impacts to marine biota. Four sampling events were conducted between September 2016 and June 2017. Sample media included: water (dissolved and total fractions of metals), sediments (suspended and bottom), and biota (transplanted mussels and biofilms). We found strong evidence, across sample media that Cu accumulate inside marinas to higher levels than outside marinas, regardless of marina configuration. Marinas that are more enclosed, where water is slower to flush in and out, accumulated higher levels of Cu than more open marinas. However, concentrations of Cu were rarely high enough to be above the state water quality criterion for acute impacts to aquatic life. Sediment Cu was also not above the state criteria for the protection of benthic invertebrates. This study provides an adequate baseline dataset to measure progress as a result of recent legislation towards the reduction of Cu to Puget Sound from marinas.