Presentation Abstract

Native shellfish aquaculture has many benefits, but interbreeding of hatchery and wild populations may pose genetic risks to wild populations. The type and magnitude of these risks depends in part on the genetic population structure of native shellfish species. Early genetic studies on marine shellfish provided little evidence for such structure. However, recent population genetic studies provide higher resolution, make use of both neutral and non-neutral molecular markers, and suggest some marine shellfish can exhibit population structure and even local adaptation. Here, we present preliminary results on genetic differentiation among populations of Crassadoma gigantea (the purple-hinged rock scallop) and Parastichopus californicus (the giant California sea cucumber), two native species that are currently being developed for aquaculture production in Puget Sound. Data for both species demonstrate high levels of genetic diversity and indications for population structuring by geography. Additionally, data for P. californicus suggest a potential cryptic species. Results will be used in a genetic risk model to quantify risk under multiple management scenarios, which will provide decision support to resource managers and other stakeholders. Our study shows the importance of population structure for genetic risk assessment and the power of combining empirical data, computer modeling and end-user input.

Session Title

Restoring Shellfish Harvesting Beaches in the Transboundary Salish Sea

Keywords

Population genetics, Native shellfish, Risk assessment, Aquaculture

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-18

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 11:15 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:00 AM Apr 5th, 11:15 AM

Population genetics of native shellfish aquaculture species and potential genetic risks of cultivation

Native shellfish aquaculture has many benefits, but interbreeding of hatchery and wild populations may pose genetic risks to wild populations. The type and magnitude of these risks depends in part on the genetic population structure of native shellfish species. Early genetic studies on marine shellfish provided little evidence for such structure. However, recent population genetic studies provide higher resolution, make use of both neutral and non-neutral molecular markers, and suggest some marine shellfish can exhibit population structure and even local adaptation. Here, we present preliminary results on genetic differentiation among populations of Crassadoma gigantea (the purple-hinged rock scallop) and Parastichopus californicus (the giant California sea cucumber), two native species that are currently being developed for aquaculture production in Puget Sound. Data for both species demonstrate high levels of genetic diversity and indications for population structuring by geography. Additionally, data for P. californicus suggest a potential cryptic species. Results will be used in a genetic risk model to quantify risk under multiple management scenarios, which will provide decision support to resource managers and other stakeholders. Our study shows the importance of population structure for genetic risk assessment and the power of combining empirical data, computer modeling and end-user input.