Presentation Abstract

Multivariate statistical methods (collectively referred to as chemometrics) are a valuable means of reducing the variability and complexity of large data sets. When incorporated with data visualization tools such as Geographical Information Systems (GIS), the output of these chemometric methods can be presented in a manner that is both intuitive and more readily usable for informing policy decisions. We have used these chemometric methods and visualization tools to evaluate the distributions of, and contributions from, various dioxin/furan congener profiles in sediments at three embayments in Puget Sound. One of these embayments was Budd Inlet, which is located in the south Sound area and is bordered by the city of Olympia, WA to the south. The dioxin/furan congener data set for Budd Inlet is among the largest in Puget Sound. Chemometric analysis of this data set revealed a pattern of three unique dioxin/furan endmembers (congener profiles), contributing nearly 98 percent of the total variance across the Inlet. The three profiles were correlated to the following upland sources: 1) hog fuel boiler emissions, 2) pentachlorophenol from historical wood treatment, and 3) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The percent contribution of these endmembers to each sediment sample was mapped spatially using GIS, demonstrating the distribution of each source and the general increasing or decreasing gradient of each source moving north out of Budd Inlet. The results from this analysis is an important component in determining the appropriate data set for calculating background values, which is key to identifying and cleaning up contaminated sediment sites.

Session Title

Modeling the Effects of Pesticides, Toxicants, and Multiple Stressors on the Fish Populations and Ecological Communities of the Salish Sea

Keywords

Dioxin, Chemometrics, Forensics

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-411

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 11:15 AM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:00 AM Apr 5th, 11:15 AM

Using multivariate statistical tools to evaluate dioxin/furan congener profiles and inform policy decisions

Multivariate statistical methods (collectively referred to as chemometrics) are a valuable means of reducing the variability and complexity of large data sets. When incorporated with data visualization tools such as Geographical Information Systems (GIS), the output of these chemometric methods can be presented in a manner that is both intuitive and more readily usable for informing policy decisions. We have used these chemometric methods and visualization tools to evaluate the distributions of, and contributions from, various dioxin/furan congener profiles in sediments at three embayments in Puget Sound. One of these embayments was Budd Inlet, which is located in the south Sound area and is bordered by the city of Olympia, WA to the south. The dioxin/furan congener data set for Budd Inlet is among the largest in Puget Sound. Chemometric analysis of this data set revealed a pattern of three unique dioxin/furan endmembers (congener profiles), contributing nearly 98 percent of the total variance across the Inlet. The three profiles were correlated to the following upland sources: 1) hog fuel boiler emissions, 2) pentachlorophenol from historical wood treatment, and 3) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The percent contribution of these endmembers to each sediment sample was mapped spatially using GIS, demonstrating the distribution of each source and the general increasing or decreasing gradient of each source moving north out of Budd Inlet. The results from this analysis is an important component in determining the appropriate data set for calculating background values, which is key to identifying and cleaning up contaminated sediment sites.