Event Title

Deliberative mapping for a changing Salish Sea

Presentation Abstract

Fragmented Ocean Acidification (OA) and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) data for the Salish Sea is a barrier to more effective transboundary ecosystem understanding and governance. There are several ecological indicators that could help to reflect health of the Salish Sea. Indicators can be separated into two categories: biological and chemical. Examples of biological indicators include pteropods, shellfish, seagrass; chemical indicators are aragonite saturation, pH, pCO2. However, the indicators are derived from different sources, cover different time periods, and cover different spatial areas of the Salish Sea. I am addressing the following questions to address gaps in indicator data. First, what are the most informative ecological indicators to discern critical climate risk trends from OA? Second, How can MPAs in the Salish Sea and their OA indicator data be effectively mapped? My study will engage both Salish Sea marine ecologists and Geographic Information Scientists through semi-structured interviews, online surveys, and analytic deliberative focus groups. They will help me identify the best OA indicators and cartographic designs for an informative and user-friendly interactive map. The produced map can be further developed to provide more information and data on other OA indicators, or other MPA threats such a pollution, water quality, or species tracking. Furthermore, this project can reflect and provide support on current and future marine policies addressed in the Salish Sea around OA and other climate change issues.

Session Title

Posters: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, & Research

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-1

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Deliberative mapping for a changing Salish Sea

Fragmented Ocean Acidification (OA) and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) data for the Salish Sea is a barrier to more effective transboundary ecosystem understanding and governance. There are several ecological indicators that could help to reflect health of the Salish Sea. Indicators can be separated into two categories: biological and chemical. Examples of biological indicators include pteropods, shellfish, seagrass; chemical indicators are aragonite saturation, pH, pCO2. However, the indicators are derived from different sources, cover different time periods, and cover different spatial areas of the Salish Sea. I am addressing the following questions to address gaps in indicator data. First, what are the most informative ecological indicators to discern critical climate risk trends from OA? Second, How can MPAs in the Salish Sea and their OA indicator data be effectively mapped? My study will engage both Salish Sea marine ecologists and Geographic Information Scientists through semi-structured interviews, online surveys, and analytic deliberative focus groups. They will help me identify the best OA indicators and cartographic designs for an informative and user-friendly interactive map. The produced map can be further developed to provide more information and data on other OA indicators, or other MPA threats such a pollution, water quality, or species tracking. Furthermore, this project can reflect and provide support on current and future marine policies addressed in the Salish Sea around OA and other climate change issues.