Event Title

Investigating the vulnerability of nearshore coastal communities in British Columbia to ocean acidification

Presentation Abstract

Ocean acidification and reduced aragonite saturation states have been shown to negatively impact shellfish such as oysters, clams and mussels. These shellfish are commercially, socially and culturally important to coastal communities in British Columbia (BC). These organisms occupy nearshore regions, as do aquaculture operations. Ocean acidification may be amplified by a multitude of drivers in these regions. We aim to identify which BC communities are vulnerable to ocean acidification, at the municipality scale, using a multidisciplinary vulnerability assessment. We will use indicators of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity to identify which BC communities are most vulnerable, which, when complete may assist in early and efficient adaptation and mitigation. We aim to produce a fine scale and highly tailored assessment for BC, by using indicators of sensitivity and adaptive capacity that are BC specific. We have collected and will use carbonate data from nearshore shellfish aquaculture sites in the Salish Sea, to provide a more realistic assessment of exposure than would have been achieved using coarse resolution ocean circulation models, which are not able to capture nearshore drivers of carbonate chemistry. Finally, we will compare our initial work with recent assessments in the neighbouring Washington State.

Session Title

Posters: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, & Research

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-7

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Investigating the vulnerability of nearshore coastal communities in British Columbia to ocean acidification

Ocean acidification and reduced aragonite saturation states have been shown to negatively impact shellfish such as oysters, clams and mussels. These shellfish are commercially, socially and culturally important to coastal communities in British Columbia (BC). These organisms occupy nearshore regions, as do aquaculture operations. Ocean acidification may be amplified by a multitude of drivers in these regions. We aim to identify which BC communities are vulnerable to ocean acidification, at the municipality scale, using a multidisciplinary vulnerability assessment. We will use indicators of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity to identify which BC communities are most vulnerable, which, when complete may assist in early and efficient adaptation and mitigation. We aim to produce a fine scale and highly tailored assessment for BC, by using indicators of sensitivity and adaptive capacity that are BC specific. We have collected and will use carbonate data from nearshore shellfish aquaculture sites in the Salish Sea, to provide a more realistic assessment of exposure than would have been achieved using coarse resolution ocean circulation models, which are not able to capture nearshore drivers of carbonate chemistry. Finally, we will compare our initial work with recent assessments in the neighbouring Washington State.