Event Title

Red Tide and Coast Salish Peoples

Presentation Abstract

The Salish Sea is one of the world’s largest biologically lush seas. Within the Salish Sea is Lummi Bay, located in Bellingham, Washington that surrounds the Lummi people and its Nation. Many Coast Salish tribes, including Lummi Nation, have fished and harvested from the Salish Sea for thousands of years. Today fishing and shellfish harvesting is still relevant for food, potlatch and ceremony purposes. Native people have always known about red tide (harmful algae), knowledge of red tide has been passed down with each generation and some of the teachings include what part of the shellfish to harvest when there is a bloom to minimize exposure to toxins. With excess nutrients entering the sea, such as pet waste, sewage, and fertilizers, along with heavy rainfall and warmer temperatures, harmful algal blooms are expected to increase in size, duration, and consequences. Many tribal and state agencies, in stewardship for their land, monitor for harmful algal blooms and toxins. Native Americans that live and work along the Salish Sea and harvest shellfish for subsistence are feeling the effects of harmful algae, where more harvesting closures means no work or food on the table. The Salish Sea Research Center at Northwest Indian College is supporting tribal monitoring, while working with Lummi Natural Resources, by including passive toxin tracking. This may provide early evidence of toxin contamination in the water column before it reaches shellfish, and decrease closure times due to toxigenic harmful algae by providing more data points and faster turn around time. Here we present our long-term monitoring plan and preliminary data while focusing on the cultural ties that the Lummi people have with harmful algae and shellfish harvesting.

Session Title

Posters: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, & Research

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-9

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Red Tide and Coast Salish Peoples

The Salish Sea is one of the world’s largest biologically lush seas. Within the Salish Sea is Lummi Bay, located in Bellingham, Washington that surrounds the Lummi people and its Nation. Many Coast Salish tribes, including Lummi Nation, have fished and harvested from the Salish Sea for thousands of years. Today fishing and shellfish harvesting is still relevant for food, potlatch and ceremony purposes. Native people have always known about red tide (harmful algae), knowledge of red tide has been passed down with each generation and some of the teachings include what part of the shellfish to harvest when there is a bloom to minimize exposure to toxins. With excess nutrients entering the sea, such as pet waste, sewage, and fertilizers, along with heavy rainfall and warmer temperatures, harmful algal blooms are expected to increase in size, duration, and consequences. Many tribal and state agencies, in stewardship for their land, monitor for harmful algal blooms and toxins. Native Americans that live and work along the Salish Sea and harvest shellfish for subsistence are feeling the effects of harmful algae, where more harvesting closures means no work or food on the table. The Salish Sea Research Center at Northwest Indian College is supporting tribal monitoring, while working with Lummi Natural Resources, by including passive toxin tracking. This may provide early evidence of toxin contamination in the water column before it reaches shellfish, and decrease closure times due to toxigenic harmful algae by providing more data points and faster turn around time. Here we present our long-term monitoring plan and preliminary data while focusing on the cultural ties that the Lummi people have with harmful algae and shellfish harvesting.