Event Title

Researching and observing harmful microorganisms in the Salish Sea

Presentation Abstract

In the Pacific Northwest tribes all along these coastal waters have been deeply impacted due to the affects of harmful algal blooms (HABs). The cause of these HABs are likely due to climate change, agricultural nutrient additions, and human causes. We investigated phytoplankton communities in the Salish Sea during July-August of 2017 to see if there was presence of phytoplankton responsible for HABs including; Alexandrium, Cochlodinium, Pseudo-nitzschia, and Dinophysis spp.In order to monitor harmful algae species, studying, collecting, and observing phytoplankton can be enhanced in a research lab. We used a series of field and laboratory methods to identify harmful algae species, and monitor for the biotoxins they produce. These include targeted sampling in Bellingham Bay at the Se’lhaem buoy, Gooseberry Point on Lummi Nation, and Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, WA. We combined water quality methods, microscopy counts, and Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) samplers to identify harmful algal species and if toxins were produced. Ultimately, we had found the presence of Alexandrium, Cochlodinium, Pseudo-nitzschia, and Dinophysis in the Salish Sea. This project was a pre-monitoring project, and focused on method development, targeted species identification, and site deployment for future microscopy and SPATT sampling in Bellingham and Lulmmi Bay, WA.

Session Title

Posters: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, & Research

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-11

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Researching and observing harmful microorganisms in the Salish Sea

In the Pacific Northwest tribes all along these coastal waters have been deeply impacted due to the affects of harmful algal blooms (HABs). The cause of these HABs are likely due to climate change, agricultural nutrient additions, and human causes. We investigated phytoplankton communities in the Salish Sea during July-August of 2017 to see if there was presence of phytoplankton responsible for HABs including; Alexandrium, Cochlodinium, Pseudo-nitzschia, and Dinophysis spp.In order to monitor harmful algae species, studying, collecting, and observing phytoplankton can be enhanced in a research lab. We used a series of field and laboratory methods to identify harmful algae species, and monitor for the biotoxins they produce. These include targeted sampling in Bellingham Bay at the Se’lhaem buoy, Gooseberry Point on Lummi Nation, and Squalicum Harbor in Bellingham, WA. We combined water quality methods, microscopy counts, and Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT) samplers to identify harmful algal species and if toxins were produced. Ultimately, we had found the presence of Alexandrium, Cochlodinium, Pseudo-nitzschia, and Dinophysis in the Salish Sea. This project was a pre-monitoring project, and focused on method development, targeted species identification, and site deployment for future microscopy and SPATT sampling in Bellingham and Lulmmi Bay, WA.