Event Title

Evaluating agricultural contributions to nonpoint source pollution in the Deschutes watershed of south Puget Sound

Presentation Abstract

The 2015 Deschutes River Total Maximum Daily Load Report (TMDL) by Washington State Department of Ecology (ECY) recommends actions to improve bacteria, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and fine sediment in the Deschutes watershed. There is a well-documented need to address agricultural nonpoint source pollution, but the extent of agricultural contributions to water quality degradation are unknown. For this project, a diverse group of stakeholders was convened that integrated regulatory, non-regulatory, and agricultural research entities. Thurston County Stormwater Utility (TCSU), WSU Extension Agriculture Program, and Thurston Conservation District (TCD) began a collaborative partnership in 2017. The goal was to produce and use data that supports the collective goals of stakeholders to address nonpoint source water pollution concerns. Outcomes of this work proposed for the poster session include 1) data collection methodology, and 2) data summaries that characterize agricultural activity and natural resources on agricultural land. Data for Reichel Lake basin and Lake Lawrence basin in the Deschutes Middle Mainstem are highlighted, which have been identified as priority areas for restoration. These results are representative of data being collected for all the basins within the Deschutes watershed. The long-term aim of this project is to better understand the intersection of natural resource management and agricultural lands management. We intend to integrate the data we collect on agricultural activity with existing data on natural resources to direct outreach and actions for protection and restoration. The data will be utilized to better target outreach efforts, engage landowners voluntarily, and identify a need for cost-share funding to implement best management practices on agricultural lands. Research objectives and data collection for this project prioritized cooperation between producers and users of data. Data production and use was integrated in this project to more effectively address nonpoint source pollution in Thurston County.

Session Title

Posters: Ecosystem Management, Policy, & Protection

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-52

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Evaluating agricultural contributions to nonpoint source pollution in the Deschutes watershed of south Puget Sound

The 2015 Deschutes River Total Maximum Daily Load Report (TMDL) by Washington State Department of Ecology (ECY) recommends actions to improve bacteria, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and fine sediment in the Deschutes watershed. There is a well-documented need to address agricultural nonpoint source pollution, but the extent of agricultural contributions to water quality degradation are unknown. For this project, a diverse group of stakeholders was convened that integrated regulatory, non-regulatory, and agricultural research entities. Thurston County Stormwater Utility (TCSU), WSU Extension Agriculture Program, and Thurston Conservation District (TCD) began a collaborative partnership in 2017. The goal was to produce and use data that supports the collective goals of stakeholders to address nonpoint source water pollution concerns. Outcomes of this work proposed for the poster session include 1) data collection methodology, and 2) data summaries that characterize agricultural activity and natural resources on agricultural land. Data for Reichel Lake basin and Lake Lawrence basin in the Deschutes Middle Mainstem are highlighted, which have been identified as priority areas for restoration. These results are representative of data being collected for all the basins within the Deschutes watershed. The long-term aim of this project is to better understand the intersection of natural resource management and agricultural lands management. We intend to integrate the data we collect on agricultural activity with existing data on natural resources to direct outreach and actions for protection and restoration. The data will be utilized to better target outreach efforts, engage landowners voluntarily, and identify a need for cost-share funding to implement best management practices on agricultural lands. Research objectives and data collection for this project prioritized cooperation between producers and users of data. Data production and use was integrated in this project to more effectively address nonpoint source pollution in Thurston County.