Presentation Abstract

In many cases stormwater compliance monitoring is labor intensive, expensive, and largely unsuccessful in providing the data needed to support stormwater management goals. In addition, data from manual grab sampling and automated composite sampling are rarely collected in a manner that provides the information required to identify sources of contamination, evaluate the effectiveness of Best Management Practices, and inform effective decision making. Furthermore, monitoring is often driven by the need to meet low concentration benchmarks for metals and other constituents that do not take into account loading into the receiving waters, resulting in arbitrary monitoring requirements (monthly or seasonally) that are not tied to the driving forces within the watershed such as hydrology (flow regime), weather (storm events and antecedent dry periods), and upland land use and cover. To help address these issues, passive sampling devices including Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT) for metals and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samples (POCIS) for a wide range of household, personal care, pharmaceutical, and endocrine disrupting compounds are being used to monitor stormwater runoff. In the Puget Sound a network of monitoring stations was established in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets to assess runoff from industrial areas of Naval Base Kitsap as well as commercial, residential, and rural areas within the watershed. Passive samplers were co-located with autosamplers to provide a direct comparison with grab and composite sampling. Preliminary results from multiple DGT deployments showed that time-dependent variability in stormwater impacts on ambient metal concentrations could be detected on small time scales, as well as over multiple days of rainfall. The POCIS samplers showed that a wide range of organic compounds could be reliably detected from the surveillance monitoring which should prove very useful for finger printing likely sources of contamination in stormwater runoff in the areas monitored.

Session Title

Posters: Fate, Transport, & Toxicity of Chemicals

Keywords

passive sampler, stormwater, Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samples (POCIS), Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT)

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-56

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Assessing 21st century contaminants of concern using integrative passive sampling devices to obtain more meaningful and cost effective data on impacts from stormwater runoff

In many cases stormwater compliance monitoring is labor intensive, expensive, and largely unsuccessful in providing the data needed to support stormwater management goals. In addition, data from manual grab sampling and automated composite sampling are rarely collected in a manner that provides the information required to identify sources of contamination, evaluate the effectiveness of Best Management Practices, and inform effective decision making. Furthermore, monitoring is often driven by the need to meet low concentration benchmarks for metals and other constituents that do not take into account loading into the receiving waters, resulting in arbitrary monitoring requirements (monthly or seasonally) that are not tied to the driving forces within the watershed such as hydrology (flow regime), weather (storm events and antecedent dry periods), and upland land use and cover. To help address these issues, passive sampling devices including Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT) for metals and Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samples (POCIS) for a wide range of household, personal care, pharmaceutical, and endocrine disrupting compounds are being used to monitor stormwater runoff. In the Puget Sound a network of monitoring stations was established in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets to assess runoff from industrial areas of Naval Base Kitsap as well as commercial, residential, and rural areas within the watershed. Passive samplers were co-located with autosamplers to provide a direct comparison with grab and composite sampling. Preliminary results from multiple DGT deployments showed that time-dependent variability in stormwater impacts on ambient metal concentrations could be detected on small time scales, as well as over multiple days of rainfall. The POCIS samplers showed that a wide range of organic compounds could be reliably detected from the surveillance monitoring which should prove very useful for finger printing likely sources of contamination in stormwater runoff in the areas monitored.