Event Title

Efficacy of compost amended biofiltration swales as green stormwater infrastructure for treatment of toxicants in Salish Sea road run-off

Presentation Abstract

Biofiltration swales, or bioswales, use vegetated soil substrates to filter contaminants from stormwater, decrease sediment load, and reduce erosion. Following a storm, runoff moves slowly through the swale at a shallow depth. While stormwater is retained in the bioswales, pollutants are removed by the combined effects of filtration, infiltration, settling, and biotransformation. The system currently being evaluated at the Washington State University (WSU) Puyallup Research and Extension Center (PREC) uses compost to further enhance the ability of bioswales to remove toxicants. WSDOT has created guidelines for constructing compost amended biofiltration swales (CABS) and implemented a field test for CABS along Washington State Route (SR) 518 in 2009. As part of an ongoing study, influent and effluent samples are currently being collected at the field site during storm events and tested for metals, PAHs, pesticides, phthalates, and unknowns (LC-QTOF). Acute toxicity and sub-lethal effects of stormwater were also measured using zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassays. Along with researchers from University of Washington (UW) we created a laboratory model for CABS at the WSU PREC to verify field test results in a controlled setting and identify ways that the WSDOT design could be improved. This system is exposed to highway runoff from a previously studied high volume source off SR 520 and tested at different flow rates, swale lengths, and slope gradients. Paired chemistry and toxicology data show how stormwater treatment by CABS differ from traditional soil biofiltration methods. Results presented at Salish Sea show how zebrafish developmental biology is affected by stormwater treatments and how CABS design impacts toxicant treatment efficacy.

Session Title

Posters: Fate, Transport, & Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-62

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Efficacy of compost amended biofiltration swales as green stormwater infrastructure for treatment of toxicants in Salish Sea road run-off

Biofiltration swales, or bioswales, use vegetated soil substrates to filter contaminants from stormwater, decrease sediment load, and reduce erosion. Following a storm, runoff moves slowly through the swale at a shallow depth. While stormwater is retained in the bioswales, pollutants are removed by the combined effects of filtration, infiltration, settling, and biotransformation. The system currently being evaluated at the Washington State University (WSU) Puyallup Research and Extension Center (PREC) uses compost to further enhance the ability of bioswales to remove toxicants. WSDOT has created guidelines for constructing compost amended biofiltration swales (CABS) and implemented a field test for CABS along Washington State Route (SR) 518 in 2009. As part of an ongoing study, influent and effluent samples are currently being collected at the field site during storm events and tested for metals, PAHs, pesticides, phthalates, and unknowns (LC-QTOF). Acute toxicity and sub-lethal effects of stormwater were also measured using zebrafish (Danio rerio) bioassays. Along with researchers from University of Washington (UW) we created a laboratory model for CABS at the WSU PREC to verify field test results in a controlled setting and identify ways that the WSDOT design could be improved. This system is exposed to highway runoff from a previously studied high volume source off SR 520 and tested at different flow rates, swale lengths, and slope gradients. Paired chemistry and toxicology data show how stormwater treatment by CABS differ from traditional soil biofiltration methods. Results presented at Salish Sea show how zebrafish developmental biology is affected by stormwater treatments and how CABS design impacts toxicant treatment efficacy.