Presentation Abstract

Demand for protein sources is high in North America and growing throughout the world. Global declines in fisheries has encouraged coastal regions to embrace aquaculture as a means of reconciling the growing pressures on wild fish stocks with this demand. Intensive salmon farming practices result in periodic infestations with naturally-occurring parasitic copepods referred to as “sea lice”. To prevent productivity losses, a variety of chemical and physical treatments have been implemented through regulatory systems or emergency applications. One objective of this study is to determine if these chemo-therapeutic treatments pose a risk to other non-target marine organisms including crustaceans such as the Spot prawn (Pandalus platyceros). These organisms can be both culturally and economically important to local First Nations and all residents of the Salish Sea region, as well as crucial components of marine ecosystems. The sub-chronic toxicity of the sea lice pesticides Slice® (active ingredient: emamectin benzoate) was assessed for lethal and sub-lethal effects on Pacific prawns, amphipods, and polychaetes which are all found in areas where aquaculture pens exist. Slice and ivermectin whole sediment exposures were conducted. Test concentrations were representative of environmentally-relevant levels. The toxicity of these treatments was assessed using the endpoints of: mortality, growth, and behavioural response. Preliminary results indicate a concentration-response relationship for various selected endpoints.

Session Title

Posters: Fate, Transport, & Toxicity of Chemicals

Keywords

Aquaculture, Aquatic toxicology, Chemotherapeutants

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-63

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Toxicity testing of Atlantic salmon aquaculture chemotherapeutants on spot prawns and benthic invertebrates

Demand for protein sources is high in North America and growing throughout the world. Global declines in fisheries has encouraged coastal regions to embrace aquaculture as a means of reconciling the growing pressures on wild fish stocks with this demand. Intensive salmon farming practices result in periodic infestations with naturally-occurring parasitic copepods referred to as “sea lice”. To prevent productivity losses, a variety of chemical and physical treatments have been implemented through regulatory systems or emergency applications. One objective of this study is to determine if these chemo-therapeutic treatments pose a risk to other non-target marine organisms including crustaceans such as the Spot prawn (Pandalus platyceros). These organisms can be both culturally and economically important to local First Nations and all residents of the Salish Sea region, as well as crucial components of marine ecosystems. The sub-chronic toxicity of the sea lice pesticides Slice® (active ingredient: emamectin benzoate) was assessed for lethal and sub-lethal effects on Pacific prawns, amphipods, and polychaetes which are all found in areas where aquaculture pens exist. Slice and ivermectin whole sediment exposures were conducted. Test concentrations were representative of environmentally-relevant levels. The toxicity of these treatments was assessed using the endpoints of: mortality, growth, and behavioural response. Preliminary results indicate a concentration-response relationship for various selected endpoints.