Event Title

Assessing restoration performance at the Nisqually River Delta: opportunity, capacity, and realized function

Presentation Abstract

The restoration of the Nisqually River Delta represents one of the largest efforts toward re-establishing the ecosystem function and resilience of modified habitat in the Puget Sound, particularly for anadromous salmonid species. Here we use monitoring and applied studies to assess restoration performance within a tiered framework of Opportunity, Capacity, and Realized Function. Opportunity is evaluated with physical metrics for outmigrating salmon to access and benefit from the expansion of newly restored habitat. Capacity refers to specific functions of the restored habitats, such as the capacity to produce prey resources for outmigrating salmon. And realized function is the integration of Opportunity and Capacity metrics so that outmigrating salmon would benefit from accessing and foraging in newly restored habitats. We monitored and modeled a variety of physical parameters to measure changes in opportunity potential from historic, pre-restoration, and post-restoration habitat conditions at several sites across the delta. These parameters included channel morphology, water quality, tidal elevation, and landscape connectivity. Biological monitoring and applied studies included vegetation, invertebrate prey, salmonids, and waterbirds. Here we present synthesize the research results and publications to provide further insights to the ecosystem response to restoration processes.

Session Title

Posters: Habitat Restoration & Protection

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-86

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Assessing restoration performance at the Nisqually River Delta: opportunity, capacity, and realized function

The restoration of the Nisqually River Delta represents one of the largest efforts toward re-establishing the ecosystem function and resilience of modified habitat in the Puget Sound, particularly for anadromous salmonid species. Here we use monitoring and applied studies to assess restoration performance within a tiered framework of Opportunity, Capacity, and Realized Function. Opportunity is evaluated with physical metrics for outmigrating salmon to access and benefit from the expansion of newly restored habitat. Capacity refers to specific functions of the restored habitats, such as the capacity to produce prey resources for outmigrating salmon. And realized function is the integration of Opportunity and Capacity metrics so that outmigrating salmon would benefit from accessing and foraging in newly restored habitats. We monitored and modeled a variety of physical parameters to measure changes in opportunity potential from historic, pre-restoration, and post-restoration habitat conditions at several sites across the delta. These parameters included channel morphology, water quality, tidal elevation, and landscape connectivity. Biological monitoring and applied studies included vegetation, invertebrate prey, salmonids, and waterbirds. Here we present synthesize the research results and publications to provide further insights to the ecosystem response to restoration processes.