Event Title

Norovirus outbreaks: Winter 2017

Presentation Abstract

Between January and April 2017, the Washington State Department of Health received reports of over 150 norovirus illnesses potentially due to the consumption of Washington oysters. Six of the individuals were lab-confirmed cases while the rest of the cases were epidemiologically-linked. A total of 124 of those illnesses, among fifteen illness clusters, led to six growing area closures and recalls. Norovirus is a highly contagious respiratory infection that primarily causes diarrhea and vomiting. While the majority of illnesses were traced back to oysters harvested from Hammersley Inlet growing area, both Samish Bay and Bay Center growing areas were also implicated in outbreaks. More than 24,000 dozen oysters and 43,000 pounds of clams were recalled in March and April due to these outbreaks. Reflecting on this past year and thinking towards the future: What do we know about the source of norovirus in oysters? What are we doing to find out more? What lessons learned can be applied to prevent future illnesses? This investigation follows the steps taken to evaluate the many possible pollution sources that may impact harvest sites in commercial shellfish harvest areas during a Norovirus illness outbreak.

Session Title

Posters: Habitat Restoration & Protection

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-73

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Norovirus outbreaks: Winter 2017

Between January and April 2017, the Washington State Department of Health received reports of over 150 norovirus illnesses potentially due to the consumption of Washington oysters. Six of the individuals were lab-confirmed cases while the rest of the cases were epidemiologically-linked. A total of 124 of those illnesses, among fifteen illness clusters, led to six growing area closures and recalls. Norovirus is a highly contagious respiratory infection that primarily causes diarrhea and vomiting. While the majority of illnesses were traced back to oysters harvested from Hammersley Inlet growing area, both Samish Bay and Bay Center growing areas were also implicated in outbreaks. More than 24,000 dozen oysters and 43,000 pounds of clams were recalled in March and April due to these outbreaks. Reflecting on this past year and thinking towards the future: What do we know about the source of norovirus in oysters? What are we doing to find out more? What lessons learned can be applied to prevent future illnesses? This investigation follows the steps taken to evaluate the many possible pollution sources that may impact harvest sites in commercial shellfish harvest areas during a Norovirus illness outbreak.