Presentation Abstract

Rockfish are a long-lived species group that provide an important function for the food web dynamics in the Salish Sea, as both a mid-level trophic predator and important prey source, and they hold cultural significance to the region. Rockfish are comprised of over 25 different species locally, and over 60 species from California to Alaska. Many species experienced declines since the 1980’s, and two species are listed in the Salish Sea under ESA as threatened (yelloweye) or endangered (Bocaccio). Different species occupy a range of habitat types, from deep-water rock piles and hard bottom substrate, to nearshore kelp forests and eelgrass beds. As individuals grow their habitat associations change, such that protection and conservation efforts require a broad understanding of individual species and life history needs. State and federal agencies have conducted monitoring surveys for decades, and recovery efforts are currently being developed to improve habitats and resources for rockfish. A majority of research has focused on sub-adult and adult rockfish, but recent efforts study the distribution, settlement, and habitat use of young-of-the-year (YOY) and juvenile rockfish. Due to the paucity of government resources, the contributions of citizen scientists are expected to play a valuable role. Our session will include a review of survey methods and techniques that target a suite of rockfish species, habitats, and life history stages. The objective is to bring together researchers from the US and Canada in an effort to connect resources and discuss opportunities for collaborative projects for recovery of these iconic species. Topics include methods and challenges to surveying benthic and midwater rockfish species, YOY volunteer monitoring and data analysis, kelp habitat recovery, and policy and management.

Session Title

Posters: Species & Food Webs

Keywords

Rockfish, Recovery, Conservation, Management

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-104

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

NOAA rockfish recovery management and research in the Salish Sea, Washington

Rockfish are a long-lived species group that provide an important function for the food web dynamics in the Salish Sea, as both a mid-level trophic predator and important prey source, and they hold cultural significance to the region. Rockfish are comprised of over 25 different species locally, and over 60 species from California to Alaska. Many species experienced declines since the 1980’s, and two species are listed in the Salish Sea under ESA as threatened (yelloweye) or endangered (Bocaccio). Different species occupy a range of habitat types, from deep-water rock piles and hard bottom substrate, to nearshore kelp forests and eelgrass beds. As individuals grow their habitat associations change, such that protection and conservation efforts require a broad understanding of individual species and life history needs. State and federal agencies have conducted monitoring surveys for decades, and recovery efforts are currently being developed to improve habitats and resources for rockfish. A majority of research has focused on sub-adult and adult rockfish, but recent efforts study the distribution, settlement, and habitat use of young-of-the-year (YOY) and juvenile rockfish. Due to the paucity of government resources, the contributions of citizen scientists are expected to play a valuable role. Our session will include a review of survey methods and techniques that target a suite of rockfish species, habitats, and life history stages. The objective is to bring together researchers from the US and Canada in an effort to connect resources and discuss opportunities for collaborative projects for recovery of these iconic species. Topics include methods and challenges to surveying benthic and midwater rockfish species, YOY volunteer monitoring and data analysis, kelp habitat recovery, and policy and management.