Event Title

Species-specific identification using molecular tools on planktonic field samples: complications and considerations

Presentation Abstract

High throughput molecular methods provide valuable tools for species-specific identification and quantification especially in cases where research questions require large amounts of sampling. Specifically, studies have successfully adapted real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect and enumerate hatchery-reared pelagic larvae in hopes of developing methods to replace traditional techniques which are time intensive, costly, and demand high levels of taxonomic expertise. While these techniques show promise, field validation indicates that results may be confounded by a number of factors. The present study focuses on native Olympia oyster larvae, Ostrea lurida, to explore complications with the application of RT-PCR on field samples. Using RT-PCR, differences in amplification in copies of DNA were compared with the following treatments: two size classes of larvae (<200�m, >200�m), hatchery vs. wild reared larvae, presence of eDNA in plankton sample without the focal species, and presence of eDNA in preservation solution absent of all sample material. Preliminary results indicate differences in copies of DNA exist between size classes of bivalve larvae of the same species with larger larvae having a greater number of copies. Although lab-based studies have successfully utilized RT-PCR using hatchery-raised larvae, additional research is necessary before confidently applying RT-PCR to field samples. Application of molecular tools such as RT-PCR could benefit the scientific community by providing a precise and accurate, cost effective high throughput method if able to utilize the technique on field samples reliably.

Session Title

Posters: Species & Food Webs

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-121

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Species-specific identification using molecular tools on planktonic field samples: complications and considerations

High throughput molecular methods provide valuable tools for species-specific identification and quantification especially in cases where research questions require large amounts of sampling. Specifically, studies have successfully adapted real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect and enumerate hatchery-reared pelagic larvae in hopes of developing methods to replace traditional techniques which are time intensive, costly, and demand high levels of taxonomic expertise. While these techniques show promise, field validation indicates that results may be confounded by a number of factors. The present study focuses on native Olympia oyster larvae, Ostrea lurida, to explore complications with the application of RT-PCR on field samples. Using RT-PCR, differences in amplification in copies of DNA were compared with the following treatments: two size classes of larvae (<200�m, >200�m), hatchery vs. wild reared larvae, presence of eDNA in plankton sample without the focal species, and presence of eDNA in preservation solution absent of all sample material. Preliminary results indicate differences in copies of DNA exist between size classes of bivalve larvae of the same species with larger larvae having a greater number of copies. Although lab-based studies have successfully utilized RT-PCR using hatchery-raised larvae, additional research is necessary before confidently applying RT-PCR to field samples. Application of molecular tools such as RT-PCR could benefit the scientific community by providing a precise and accurate, cost effective high throughput method if able to utilize the technique on field samples reliably.