Event Title

Tracking the spatial distribution of Ostrea lurida (Olympia Oysters) in Fidalgo Bay, WA

Presentation Abstract

Tracking the spatial distribution of Ostrea lurida (Olympia Oysters) in Fidalgo Bay, WA Kim SK¹, Becker BJ¹, McCartha MM¹, Hintz MH1,², Behrens, MD3, Allen, B4, White SW¹, Mullins DM¹, Matheson-Margullis HR1, Centurion, R1 1- University of Washington Tacoma 2- University of Washington School of Aquatic Fisheries Sciences 3- Pacific Lutheran University 4- Puget Sound Restoration Fund Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) are the only native oyster species in Washington State. Over the past 100 years populations have dwindled, but due to restoration efforts, Olympia oysters are slowly recovering. There are few studies of the larval stage of this species. In this study, we measured the distribution of larvae at surface and bottom depths of the tidal cycle. We hypothesized that larvae would be more abundant at the surface compared to the bottom of the water column based on previous observations. Samples were taken from 4 intertidal and 2 subtidal stations through pumping 100 L through a 75 µm filter in Fidalgo Bay, WA in summer 2013. Larvae were identified using light microscopy, measured for shell height and length , and tallied to determine abundance and distribution. As predicted, larvae were not randomly distributed across the bay, and more larvae were found at the surface for each site. We found an order of magnitude of more larvae at the surface during ebb tide, indicating that larvae could be transported out of the bay. These results are being combined with additional temporal and spatial sampling as well as environmental data, to fully describe the larval distribution of oysters in the bay. This study will improve restoration efforts as well as inform researchers and local communities about the early life stages of Olympia oysters.

Session Title

Posters: Species & Food Webs

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-117

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

Tracking the spatial distribution of Ostrea lurida (Olympia Oysters) in Fidalgo Bay, WA

Tracking the spatial distribution of Ostrea lurida (Olympia Oysters) in Fidalgo Bay, WA Kim SK¹, Becker BJ¹, McCartha MM¹, Hintz MH1,², Behrens, MD3, Allen, B4, White SW¹, Mullins DM¹, Matheson-Margullis HR1, Centurion, R1 1- University of Washington Tacoma 2- University of Washington School of Aquatic Fisheries Sciences 3- Pacific Lutheran University 4- Puget Sound Restoration Fund Olympia oysters (Ostrea lurida) are the only native oyster species in Washington State. Over the past 100 years populations have dwindled, but due to restoration efforts, Olympia oysters are slowly recovering. There are few studies of the larval stage of this species. In this study, we measured the distribution of larvae at surface and bottom depths of the tidal cycle. We hypothesized that larvae would be more abundant at the surface compared to the bottom of the water column based on previous observations. Samples were taken from 4 intertidal and 2 subtidal stations through pumping 100 L through a 75 µm filter in Fidalgo Bay, WA in summer 2013. Larvae were identified using light microscopy, measured for shell height and length , and tallied to determine abundance and distribution. As predicted, larvae were not randomly distributed across the bay, and more larvae were found at the surface for each site. We found an order of magnitude of more larvae at the surface during ebb tide, indicating that larvae could be transported out of the bay. These results are being combined with additional temporal and spatial sampling as well as environmental data, to fully describe the larval distribution of oysters in the bay. This study will improve restoration efforts as well as inform researchers and local communities about the early life stages of Olympia oysters.