Event Title

A permanent sanctuary and rescue center for orcas

Presentation Abstract

Panel session The Whale Sanctuary Project’s (WSP) mission is to create the first permanent seaside sanctuary for captive orcas retired from living in marine parks and aquariums. The WSP non-profit organization comprises a five-member board of directors and over fifty marine mammal expert advisors from around the world. The natural habitat facility will be designed to house and provide lifetime care for orcas, as well as serve as a regional rescue and rehabilitation facility with a focus on helping conserve the southern resident killer whale (SRKW) population. As an authentic sanctuary, the project will offer a large expanse of secure space, a full service veterinary clinic and staff, trainers and other personnel, as well as an on-site interpretive center and education programs for the public. The complexity of the Salish Sea ecosystem and stakeholder issues, and, especially, the endangered status of the SRKW, call for a collaborative multi-level approach to conservation and preservation of the orcas. As there are currently no orca rescue facilities anywhere in the Pacific Northwest, the WSP is poised to take on that role as part of it’s mission and meet that urgent need. In this panel we will discuss the various ways the WSP can be an integral part of an overall approach to recovery and conservation of SRKW by providing science and research, community engagement, education, and best practices unique to a sanctuary environment.

Session Title

Posters: Transboundary Management & Policy

Conference Track

SSE18: Posters

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE18-126

Start Date

5-4-2018 11:30 AM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

Type of Presentation

Poster

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 11:30 AM Apr 5th, 1:30 PM

A permanent sanctuary and rescue center for orcas

Panel session The Whale Sanctuary Project’s (WSP) mission is to create the first permanent seaside sanctuary for captive orcas retired from living in marine parks and aquariums. The WSP non-profit organization comprises a five-member board of directors and over fifty marine mammal expert advisors from around the world. The natural habitat facility will be designed to house and provide lifetime care for orcas, as well as serve as a regional rescue and rehabilitation facility with a focus on helping conserve the southern resident killer whale (SRKW) population. As an authentic sanctuary, the project will offer a large expanse of secure space, a full service veterinary clinic and staff, trainers and other personnel, as well as an on-site interpretive center and education programs for the public. The complexity of the Salish Sea ecosystem and stakeholder issues, and, especially, the endangered status of the SRKW, call for a collaborative multi-level approach to conservation and preservation of the orcas. As there are currently no orca rescue facilities anywhere in the Pacific Northwest, the WSP is poised to take on that role as part of it’s mission and meet that urgent need. In this panel we will discuss the various ways the WSP can be an integral part of an overall approach to recovery and conservation of SRKW by providing science and research, community engagement, education, and best practices unique to a sanctuary environment.