Presentation Abstract

The quality of near-shore coastal waters and estuaries is of great concern to North Americans, particularly as these ecosystems become increasingly threatened by pollution. An improved understanding of chemical impacts on near-shore ecosystems is essential to responsible stewardship of these coastal areas. In recent years, the aquaculture industry has become a major contributor to the Canadian economy, however, this industry’s use of chemicals, including those used in disinfectants, anti-fouling paints, and feed additives has resulted in the contamination of local net pen areas. Another complication of these net-pen areas is the abundance of sea lice on the fish, which the salmon farmers in Canada and the world need to control. contamination associated with the use of therapeutants to treat sea lice has emerged as a significant problem to non-target organisms. This study specifically addresses information gaps that need to be filled in order to understand the environmental consequences of using two chemical therapeutants for sea lice treatments, Salmosan® and Paramove 50®. Zooplankton play a key role in marine food web dynamics, biogeochemical cycling, and fish recruitment, however, despite their importance in marine environments, our knowledge of the interactions between zooplankton and aquaculture therapeutants is extremely limited. This study describes scientific studies on the lethal and sub-lethal toxicity of these two therapeutants to representative marine zooplankton species under realistic exposure scenarios. The data obtained from the proposed research is required to ensure the proper and safe use, and appropriate regulation of these aquaculture chemicals in Canada.

Session Title

Contaminants in the Salish Sea: Effects of Aquaculture Pharmaceuticals on Invertebrates and Contaminants in Aquatic Birds and Mammals

Keywords

Zooplankton, Sea lice, Pesticides

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-51

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 1:45 PM

The effects of anti-sea lice drugs and pesticides on marine zooplankton

The quality of near-shore coastal waters and estuaries is of great concern to North Americans, particularly as these ecosystems become increasingly threatened by pollution. An improved understanding of chemical impacts on near-shore ecosystems is essential to responsible stewardship of these coastal areas. In recent years, the aquaculture industry has become a major contributor to the Canadian economy, however, this industry’s use of chemicals, including those used in disinfectants, anti-fouling paints, and feed additives has resulted in the contamination of local net pen areas. Another complication of these net-pen areas is the abundance of sea lice on the fish, which the salmon farmers in Canada and the world need to control. contamination associated with the use of therapeutants to treat sea lice has emerged as a significant problem to non-target organisms. This study specifically addresses information gaps that need to be filled in order to understand the environmental consequences of using two chemical therapeutants for sea lice treatments, Salmosan® and Paramove 50®. Zooplankton play a key role in marine food web dynamics, biogeochemical cycling, and fish recruitment, however, despite their importance in marine environments, our knowledge of the interactions between zooplankton and aquaculture therapeutants is extremely limited. This study describes scientific studies on the lethal and sub-lethal toxicity of these two therapeutants to representative marine zooplankton species under realistic exposure scenarios. The data obtained from the proposed research is required to ensure the proper and safe use, and appropriate regulation of these aquaculture chemicals in Canada.