Event Title

Reflecting community values in Hood Canal

Presentation Abstract

“Respect for people, communities, and cultures” is one of The Nature Conservancy’s five core organizational values. A more lengthy description explains: “Enduring conservation success depends on the active involvement of people and partners . . . we forge relationships based on mutual benefit and trust.” In 2013, the Conservancy completed feasibility for restoring multiple estuaries in Hood Canal – the Hood Canal Large Estuaries project. The project assessed risks and opportunities in both ecological and social realms for multiple-benefit, community-driven restoration projects in one or more estuaries. Overall six were evaluated for benefits/impacts to salmon and shellfish, as well as social enabling conditions: community support, landowner support, potential political support, local sponsor engagement and likelihood of funding. Over 50 interviews provided social data. For the Quilcene, community meetings with local businesses, community activists, treaty tribes, resource managers, educators, landowners, local government represented needs and interests identified during the assessment. The community meetings were listening sessions. No projects were proposed, although the Conservancy and local sponsors articulated their interest in restoration that advanced community needs. From the meetings, a set of co-equal goals were developed for all the interests, including, but not elevating ecological restoration. The project group then took the draft goals back to the community for a validity check: 1) This is what we heard, is it right? 2) What changes are needed to fully capture your goals? Community engagement at the earliest stages has been reinforced as the Big Quilcene project progressed, led by the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement group, as well as the importance of establishing co-equal goals. The Conservancy’s process was guided by a foundational respect for local communities, and the deliberate and consistent follow-through on that value set the stage for positive project development where everyone has a voice and sees benefit.

Session Title

Insights from Community-Based Approaches to Salish Sea Restoration Projects

Conference Track

SSE6: Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE6-457

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 1:45 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 1:45 PM

Reflecting community values in Hood Canal

“Respect for people, communities, and cultures” is one of The Nature Conservancy’s five core organizational values. A more lengthy description explains: “Enduring conservation success depends on the active involvement of people and partners . . . we forge relationships based on mutual benefit and trust.” In 2013, the Conservancy completed feasibility for restoring multiple estuaries in Hood Canal – the Hood Canal Large Estuaries project. The project assessed risks and opportunities in both ecological and social realms for multiple-benefit, community-driven restoration projects in one or more estuaries. Overall six were evaluated for benefits/impacts to salmon and shellfish, as well as social enabling conditions: community support, landowner support, potential political support, local sponsor engagement and likelihood of funding. Over 50 interviews provided social data. For the Quilcene, community meetings with local businesses, community activists, treaty tribes, resource managers, educators, landowners, local government represented needs and interests identified during the assessment. The community meetings were listening sessions. No projects were proposed, although the Conservancy and local sponsors articulated their interest in restoration that advanced community needs. From the meetings, a set of co-equal goals were developed for all the interests, including, but not elevating ecological restoration. The project group then took the draft goals back to the community for a validity check: 1) This is what we heard, is it right? 2) What changes are needed to fully capture your goals? Community engagement at the earliest stages has been reinforced as the Big Quilcene project progressed, led by the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement group, as well as the importance of establishing co-equal goals. The Conservancy’s process was guided by a foundational respect for local communities, and the deliberate and consistent follow-through on that value set the stage for positive project development where everyone has a voice and sees benefit.