Presentation Abstract

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are of growing concern on the West Coast of North America. The dinoflagellate Alexandrium catanella is known to produce toxins that have the potential to concentrate in shellfish and, when consumed by humans or marine mammals, may result in Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) leading to illness or death. In Puget Sound, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) collects and tests shellfish samples to protect the health and safety of shellfish consumers as well as the livelihood of the extensive local shellfish industry. Such data have been collected since the 1950s. We analyze data from 2003 to 2016 which can be mapped onto standard indicator sites for bi-weekly time series and spatial analysis. Our analysis uses a combination of simple regression and visual assessment of maps and graphs to describe patterns within subbasins, as well as larger-scale patterns within the Salish Sea. We also make spatial comparisons between the annual initiation of toxic shellfish beds and A. catanella benthic cyst concentrations. By determining the presence or absence of spatial or temporal trends, we hope to contribute to shellfish sampling efficacy and efficiency, help prioritize shellfish sampling and location, and thereby reduce the risk of human consumption of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins.

Session Title

Harmful Phytoplankton in the Salish Sea: Part I

Keywords

Alexandrium, Paralytic shellfish toxins

Conference Track

SSE5: Climate Change: Impacts, Adaptation, and Research

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE5-301

Start Date

4-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

4-4-2018 2:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 4th, 2:00 PM Apr 4th, 2:15 PM

Reanalysis of continuous shellfish monitoring data in pursuit of temporal and spatial patterns of paralytic shellfish toxins in the Puget Sound/Salish Sea

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are of growing concern on the West Coast of North America. The dinoflagellate Alexandrium catanella is known to produce toxins that have the potential to concentrate in shellfish and, when consumed by humans or marine mammals, may result in Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) leading to illness or death. In Puget Sound, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) collects and tests shellfish samples to protect the health and safety of shellfish consumers as well as the livelihood of the extensive local shellfish industry. Such data have been collected since the 1950s. We analyze data from 2003 to 2016 which can be mapped onto standard indicator sites for bi-weekly time series and spatial analysis. Our analysis uses a combination of simple regression and visual assessment of maps and graphs to describe patterns within subbasins, as well as larger-scale patterns within the Salish Sea. We also make spatial comparisons between the annual initiation of toxic shellfish beds and A. catanella benthic cyst concentrations. By determining the presence or absence of spatial or temporal trends, we hope to contribute to shellfish sampling efficacy and efficiency, help prioritize shellfish sampling and location, and thereby reduce the risk of human consumption of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins.