Presentation Abstract

Sea lice are a cause of concern in Canada, as outbreaks in fish farms have significant implications for both farmed and wild salmonid populations. The most common sea lice treatment protocols in BC call for the subsequent release of anti-sea lice chemotherapeutants directly into the water column. These chemotherapeutants have been shown to have lethal effects on non-target crustaceans such as lobsters and prawns. This project is concerned specifically with Salmosan® (A.I. azamethiphos) which has received emergency approval in Eastern Canada and may be used in BC as aquaculture site managers look for alternatives to the most common current-use product, SLICE®. However, few experiments on Salmosan® have involved species from the West Coast. Furthermore, there is a little known about sub-lethal effects. This project addresses this data gap by investigating both the lethal and sub-lethal effects of Salmosan® on Pacific spot prawns, Pandalus platyceros under environmentally relevant multiple pulse and combined stressor scenarios. Lethality tests show post-molt prawns to be significantly more sensitive to Salmosan® than inter-molt prawns, with increasing sensitivity at higher temperatures. Molting experiments suggest that temperature negatively impacts molting survival while Salmosan® has no effect on overall molting success. Preliminary behavioural data suggest that Salmosan® has no effect on olfactory behavior while high concentrations of Salmosan® may elicit an avoidance response. The results of this project can contribute to improving chemical use regulations by informing on both selection of chemotherapeutants and design of application protocols.

Session Title

Contaminants in the Salish Sea: Effects of Aquaculture Pharmaceuticals on Invertebrates and Contaminants in Aquatic Birds and Mammals

Keywords

Aquaculture, Chemotherapeutants, Azamethiphos, Molting sea lice

Conference Track

SSE3: Fate, Transport, and Toxicity of Chemicals

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE3-7

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 2:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 1:45 PM Apr 5th, 2:00 PM

Lethal and sub-lethal effects of repeated short term exposures Salmosan (A.I. azamethiphos) on the Pacific Spot Prawn, Pandalus platyceros

Sea lice are a cause of concern in Canada, as outbreaks in fish farms have significant implications for both farmed and wild salmonid populations. The most common sea lice treatment protocols in BC call for the subsequent release of anti-sea lice chemotherapeutants directly into the water column. These chemotherapeutants have been shown to have lethal effects on non-target crustaceans such as lobsters and prawns. This project is concerned specifically with Salmosan® (A.I. azamethiphos) which has received emergency approval in Eastern Canada and may be used in BC as aquaculture site managers look for alternatives to the most common current-use product, SLICE®. However, few experiments on Salmosan® have involved species from the West Coast. Furthermore, there is a little known about sub-lethal effects. This project addresses this data gap by investigating both the lethal and sub-lethal effects of Salmosan® on Pacific spot prawns, Pandalus platyceros under environmentally relevant multiple pulse and combined stressor scenarios. Lethality tests show post-molt prawns to be significantly more sensitive to Salmosan® than inter-molt prawns, with increasing sensitivity at higher temperatures. Molting experiments suggest that temperature negatively impacts molting survival while Salmosan® has no effect on overall molting success. Preliminary behavioural data suggest that Salmosan® has no effect on olfactory behavior while high concentrations of Salmosan® may elicit an avoidance response. The results of this project can contribute to improving chemical use regulations by informing on both selection of chemotherapeutants and design of application protocols.