Presentation Abstract

A coalition led by the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group (HCSEG), Jefferson County (County), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) are partnering on an integrated multiple benefits floodplain protection and restoration project along the lower 3 miles of the Big Quilcene River. This multiple benefits project combines concepts and actions as a result of recent stakeholder and project area landowner outreach efforts. The restoration and protection project will address a suite of community needs including flood risk reduction, salmon habitat restoration, shellfish protection, water quality improvements, recreational access, education, and economic vitality. Project design and protection elements in the Lower Big Quilcene River will address constraints such as roads, bridges and levees, which will provide more room for floodwaters to spread out and flood relief for the Quilcene community, restore processes that create and maintain habitat for endangered salmon and other wildlife, and increase river access to the channel migration zone and connections to historic side channels. The project team has worked closely with shellfish interests during design phases to ensure compatibility with shellfish resource as cultural and economic important shellfish beds and growing operations must be maintained. Stakeholder and community outreach efforts in this project have been unique in planning efforts and continue to be necessary as design alternatives are developed and assessed to ensure that the project goals are being met. Stakeholder outreach has been and will continue to be central to work of project partners, including tribes, County leadership, the salmon recovery lead entity, local community groups, community businesses, and numerous shellfish stakeholders. Community landowner outreach efforts have run separate but parallel to the stakeholder outreach that provide valuable and specific insight to needs and benefits of the residential community. This project has proven that it is necessary to listen first, and realize the need to understand human dimensions which can generate ideas and support for future projects in the community.

Session Title

Insights from Community-Based Approaches to Salish Sea Restoration Projects

Keywords

Quilcene river, River restoration

Conference Track

SSE6: Communication

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE6-150

Start Date

5-4-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 2:00 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 1:45 PM Apr 5th, 2:00 PM

Lower Big Quilcene River multiple benefits restoration project

A coalition led by the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group (HCSEG), Jefferson County (County), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) are partnering on an integrated multiple benefits floodplain protection and restoration project along the lower 3 miles of the Big Quilcene River. This multiple benefits project combines concepts and actions as a result of recent stakeholder and project area landowner outreach efforts. The restoration and protection project will address a suite of community needs including flood risk reduction, salmon habitat restoration, shellfish protection, water quality improvements, recreational access, education, and economic vitality. Project design and protection elements in the Lower Big Quilcene River will address constraints such as roads, bridges and levees, which will provide more room for floodwaters to spread out and flood relief for the Quilcene community, restore processes that create and maintain habitat for endangered salmon and other wildlife, and increase river access to the channel migration zone and connections to historic side channels. The project team has worked closely with shellfish interests during design phases to ensure compatibility with shellfish resource as cultural and economic important shellfish beds and growing operations must be maintained. Stakeholder and community outreach efforts in this project have been unique in planning efforts and continue to be necessary as design alternatives are developed and assessed to ensure that the project goals are being met. Stakeholder outreach has been and will continue to be central to work of project partners, including tribes, County leadership, the salmon recovery lead entity, local community groups, community businesses, and numerous shellfish stakeholders. Community landowner outreach efforts have run separate but parallel to the stakeholder outreach that provide valuable and specific insight to needs and benefits of the residential community. This project has proven that it is necessary to listen first, and realize the need to understand human dimensions which can generate ideas and support for future projects in the community.