Event Title

Forage fish spawning beach restoration design and implementation in the Salish Sea

Presentation Abstract

Forage fish including surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus) and Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes personatus), also called candlefish, spawn on upper intertidal beaches in the Salish Sea, and are the primary food for returning adult salmon. In order to offset the long term degradation of forage fish beach spawning habitat, numerous recent restoration, monitoring, and research projects have been undertaken, especially in Washington State. This talk will focus on larger and long installed forage fish beach restoration projects. A series of case studies and lessons learned will be presented for a suite of forage fish beach restoration/enhancement will be presented. Case studies will include armor removal, beach nourishment, structure relocation, and mitigation efforts to reduce impacts of old and recent armor and sediment input reduction. Project examples begin with data collection in 1996 for a one-mile-long 1998 project in Bellingham Bay and continue through several case studies illustrating differing problems and approaches from both Puget Sound and Vancouver Island. The talk will outline site selection methods and approach and will include discussion of feasibility analysis, design goals established to maximize longevity of forage fish beach spawning areas, and approaches to minimize on-going project maintenance. Consideration of coastal processes and sediment transport, along with consideration of alterations in these processes were key elements in feasibility analysis and design. Several sites include long-term physical performance assessment through repeated beach surveying with lesser amounts of repeated forage fish egg density surveys. Impacts addressed in the case studies include the construction of new and legacy shore protection structures, which both directly buried and/or eliminated the sediment source for maintaining beach spawning habitats through cutting off feeder bluffs. Legacy structures refer to the cumulative impacts of older shore protection structures within littoral drift cells.

Session Title

Forage Fish Status, Spawning Beach Restoration and Monitoring, and Community Engagement in the Salish Sea

Conference Track

SSE1: Habitat Restoration and Protection

Conference Name

Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference (Seattle, WA : 2018)

Document Type

Event

SSEC Identifier

SSE1-310

Start Date

5-4-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

5-4-2018 2:15 PM

Type of Presentation

Oral

Contributing Repository

Digital content made available by University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Geographic Coverage

Salish Sea (B.C. and Wash.)

Rights

This resource is displayed for educational purposes only and may be subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. For more information about rights or obtaining copies of this resource, please contact University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9103, USA (360-650-7534; heritage.resources@wwu.edu) and refer to the collection name and identifier. Any materials cited must be attributed to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference Records, University Archives, Heritage Resources, Western Libraries, Western Washington University.

Type

text

Language

English

Format

application/pdf

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Apr 5th, 2:00 PM Apr 5th, 2:15 PM

Forage fish spawning beach restoration design and implementation in the Salish Sea

Forage fish including surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus) and Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes personatus), also called candlefish, spawn on upper intertidal beaches in the Salish Sea, and are the primary food for returning adult salmon. In order to offset the long term degradation of forage fish beach spawning habitat, numerous recent restoration, monitoring, and research projects have been undertaken, especially in Washington State. This talk will focus on larger and long installed forage fish beach restoration projects. A series of case studies and lessons learned will be presented for a suite of forage fish beach restoration/enhancement will be presented. Case studies will include armor removal, beach nourishment, structure relocation, and mitigation efforts to reduce impacts of old and recent armor and sediment input reduction. Project examples begin with data collection in 1996 for a one-mile-long 1998 project in Bellingham Bay and continue through several case studies illustrating differing problems and approaches from both Puget Sound and Vancouver Island. The talk will outline site selection methods and approach and will include discussion of feasibility analysis, design goals established to maximize longevity of forage fish beach spawning areas, and approaches to minimize on-going project maintenance. Consideration of coastal processes and sediment transport, along with consideration of alterations in these processes were key elements in feasibility analysis and design. Several sites include long-term physical performance assessment through repeated beach surveying with lesser amounts of repeated forage fish egg density surveys. Impacts addressed in the case studies include the construction of new and legacy shore protection structures, which both directly buried and/or eliminated the sediment source for maintaining beach spawning habitats through cutting off feeder bluffs. Legacy structures refer to the cumulative impacts of older shore protection structures within littoral drift cells.